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voltage multiplier output voltage

cheniour

Member
hello I have this voltage multiplier sextupler (Vin=1V, f=4HZ,l=30µH) please I would know the output power when the capacitor charged 1.5V any person can help me, please
 

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I'd assume it would be six times higher? (It is a six stage multiples after all). Other than that I can't really help, the file you provided is an ascii file, I don't have anything to open it with.
 

audioguru

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Your input frequency is only 4 Hz so the 12000uF capacitor C1 might take weeks to fully charge. I changed the time to 1000seconds and the simulation slowed down after 200 seconds and a charge to a little over 1.8V.
 
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cheniour

Member
audioguru thank you very very much but when I want to calculate the output power theoretically when the sextupler reaches 1.5V : first I calculate the 12000µF impedance Its impedance will be some multiple of the impedance of one of the 47 uF capacitors at 4 Hz second I calculate the current and finally the power its true like this? you can help me, please
 
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audioguru

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Since the 4Hz frequency is so low and the charging time of the large capacitor is so long then the power provided is extremely low.
 

crutschow

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rjenkinsgb

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theoretically i get output current 0.3 mA it is an acceptable value?
You say in the first post:
(Vin=1V, f=4HZ,l=30µH)
Is that supposed to be "I = 30uA" ?

Whatever the input current, the continuous current at the output of the multiplier will be a fraction of that, as the output power cannot be greater than the input, and with such a low input voltage there is a lot of loss in the diodes.

Pulsed current, if you wait as long as needed for the output cap to charge up to an adequate voltage each time, can be much higher - for a very short period. The average will be a bit below the multiplier output current.
 

audioguru

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I cropped your schematic so it is not as large as my neighborhood then the text is large enough to see.
It takes a very long time to charge the large capacitor.
 

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Visitor

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So download the software. :rolleyes:
If you want people to see what you post, post a picture, not a file many people can't or won't open. The most knowledgeable person may not see your question because of the extra effort required to understand your post. Make it easy for people to help.


Along the same lines, add some detail to subject lines. Posts titled "I need help" may be ignored by an expert. Almost every post here is asking for help. "I NEED HELP!!!! URGENTLY!!!!!!" posts are usually opened for comedic value only.
 

ronsimpson

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post a picture, not a file many people can't or won't open.
Post a file so I don't have to hand enter the schematic before I can run the file.
-------------------
Bottom line do both. Picture for those that can't read. Picture for those who don't have software. File for those who want to dig in deep into the problem.
 

audioguru

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The LTspice file is in post #1 but the schematic has its parts spread apart too much.
At only 4Hz it takes forever to run.
 

alec_t

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Most Helpful Member
please I would know the output power when the capacitor charged 1.5V
That would depend on the current through an attached load (no load is shown) and, given the extremely slow charging rate, would drop off very quickly unless the current were miniscule.
In a practical circuit, what will you have as a 1V 4Hz voltage source? What will the load be?
 

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