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voice 'sms' on mobile phone

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rugano peter

New Member
Instead of punching letters on a mobile phone to send a sms Im interested in making a circuit that could convert a voice message [spoken words] to a digital signal that could be sent via cell phone in as short a time as it takes an sms[text message] This would involve the following;

Voice recording---digitising---transmission---decoding---retrieving[voice]

[ SENDER ] OPERATOR [ RECIEVER ]

What i need is I deas on how such a CIRCUIT can be implemented.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
rugano peter said:
Instead of punching letters on a mobile phone to send a sms Im interested in making a circuit that could convert a voice message [spoken words] to a digital signal that could be sent via cell phone in as short a time as it takes an sms[text message] This would involve the following;

Voice recording---digitising---transmission---decoding---retrieving[voice]

[ SENDER ] OPERATOR [ RECIEVER ]

What i need is I deas on how such a CIRCUIT can be implemented.

It's already done, modern digital mobile phones already work like this.

You can't reduce a voice transmission to the few bytes required for an SMS text message. The quality of a digitised voice depends on the amount of data transmitted - the limits of SMS (originally only 256 bytes or so) isn't enough to send any voice message, even of quality so poor you couldn't understand it.

For a suitable analogy, imagine you want to send a car from England to Australia - why can't you simply place it in an Air-Mail envelope and put a few pence of postage on it?. What you could do though is put the plans for the car in the envelope, and let them build the car at their end.

In a similar way, you could use voice recognition to reduce a voice to a text message, send the text message, and use a voice synthesiser to read the message at the other end - but it obviously won't sound anything like the original, and you will be limited by SMS message length limits.
 
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