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Timed box lid open/close mechanism

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Iminazoo

New Member
Hi I’m new here. I am trying to create a timed open/close mechanism for a wooden box I built. The box will contain my German shepherd’s food dish. I want the hinges lid to open at a set time in the morning, then close at a set time in the evening. I have a mouse(I know, there’s never just one mouse, but let me remain in denial!) that raids the dog food in the night. I don’t always remember to close the lid.
The box is 18”L X 10”W X 10” deep and is made of 1/2” thick birch. The hinged lid is
18” X 10” X 3”. The hinges allow the top to open to 180 degrees, but i don’t want it to open that far. I have seen support chains and bars, but I’m wondering if the support could actually be used as part of the open/close mechanism, maybe pneumatic?
I’m just kind of stuck. I have lots of experience fixing things, mechanical as well as electronic, and I have recycled old toys to build moving parts for cake decorations, but this has me lost. There are so many different motors, servos, and drivers available.
I’d also like this to be a plug in motor, so I guess I could use a timer on the outlet for that if it’s easier.
If anyone has any info on what kind of motor, stop switches, supports, all of it!
I welcome any feedback or info.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
If you counter balance the lid then a large model servo will be able to do it. However, you'll need something like an Arduino to keep time and produce the servo signals.

Mike.
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
There are a lot of threads about timed, automatic chicken coop openers, exactly what you are describing. Most use a linear actuator, 12 V or 24 V, and a relatively simple timer circuit with power transistors or relays driving the mechanism.

ak
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Most use a linear actuator, 12 V or 24 V
At the used furniture store I get electronic recliner chairs for almost nothing. The linear actuator and power supply can be removed easy. Most will lift 100 to 200 pounds.
1552743551341.png
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Use this design. Drive your dog crazy.

 
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