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Three Meters One Lamp

Consider a Lamp lit using the mains voltage. And, the units of power it utilizes is determined through a power meter. But, what i want to ask is i want three power meters through which the Lamp is connected so that the power is divided equally among three meters. Any idea how this can be done in the simplest?

Example: 1 Power Meter : 1 Unit :: 1 Lamp : 1Hr.
3 Power Meter : 1/3 Unit :: 1 Lamp : 1 Hr.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I see no good reason to do that but, in real life, you would need to add some small resistance in series with each meter ( or at least two of them) to account for differences in resistance in the three paths so that each ends up carrying the same current.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Didn't understand that
I didn't either. I can only see it as a necessary if one meter cannot handle the whole load and something bad will happen if self heating causes more self heating and eventually all current going though one meter. A Doubtful situation. I don't think resistors are necessary - but. Also don't think three meters in parallel makes sense either. In fact, I don't even know why I'm part of this thread since nothing makes sense here.
 

ChrisP58

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Think of an Electro-Mechanical Meter. What are the connections. The Electro-Mechanical Energy Meter will have both series and parallel connections.
BTW, crutschow Why do we need resistance? Didn't understand that.
A meter that shows power in watts needs to know both the current passing through to the load as well as the voltage across the load.

So yes, a power meter needs both a series connection to measure the current, and a parallel connection to measure the voltage. It will then take those two measurements and multiply them to get the resulting power.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Think of an Electro-Mechanical Meter. What are the connections. The Electro-Mechanical Energy Meter will have both series and parallel connections.
BTW, crutschow Why do we need resistance? Didn't understand that.
The idea is to make sure the current is evenly shared between the three meters - no idea if it would do that correctly or not, or if they would current share without resistors?. But as Gophert said, the whole idea makes no sense at all.
 

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