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Suggest me VERY VERY basic assembly (for AVR) guide to start (suitable for 5 yrs old child)

Discussion in 'AVR' started by Willen, Dec 20, 2015.

  1. spec

    spec Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hy Willen,

    OK, I get your point about not being able to get parts, but that only materially affects item (4) in my list.

    You mention about your brother's PC. The fact that it is made from parts is not important. Do you know what operating system it rums: Windows OSX, Linux.

    You say you can get an AVR. Is that just the chip? If so are you planning on building a microcontroller board yourself?

    As a matter of interest which language do you speak. I understand that Nepal has 123 languages. From your posts on ETO your English looks pretty good and I think you are underselling yourself with the five-year-old thing.:)

    spec
     
  2. KeepItSimpleStupid

    KeepItSimpleStupid Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Willen:

    In the late 70's before the existence of PC's, me and two other lab partners effectively built a "computer" out of 7400 logic. It didn't do very much, but it was "programmable" and we "invented" the instruction set or what would be called "microcode". It was only 16 bits wide and 16 words, so a really tiny computer.

    It was designed to sort numbers from 0 through 9 in ascending or descending order depending on the "program". It had branch, compare, and swap instructions or something similar.

    Thanks Willen and absf and whoever else for my unexpected likes for post #15.
     
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  3. Willen

    Willen Well-Known Member

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    I have DVDs collection from DOS Operating system to Windows 10, almost all. Now I am running Windows XP (home ground ever) and Windows 10.
    Actually the stuffs provider is Dick Cappels (www.cappels.org), member here and moderator at allaboutcircuits.com. He is packing me different variety of AVR microcontroller chips, three types of different programmer, three types of USB to serial adapters, connectors and cables, DIP sockets etc. So that as you said I will assemble boards to get the microcontroller work. I feel so enjoy with analog electronics so making boards would be enjoyable too.
    I speak Nepal's national language (Nepali) and more than 90% speak the language. But electronics content in this language are not written till now.
    I didn't know you have such far long experience of electronics. You are lucky to see all the evolutionary change of electronics! I just know when I hear about touch screen, it was shocking news, but now a days if a 2 years baby got my simple keypad based cellphone, he/she starts to slide finger in the screen.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2016
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. KeepItSimpleStupid

    KeepItSimpleStupid Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    My parents owed a 55 Plymouth which, I think, was 6V positive ground and my father grew up on a farm where you basically learned to make things work. I was too young to know much about the 55 Plymouth. In that year, I would have been -2 years old, but I remember it well. The 62 Chevrolet I "helped fix". The 68 Chrysler, I did fix.
    Brake jobs and carb rebuilds although my parents owned that car for 17 years. Basics taught by dad and books.

    Dad used to dabble into tube radios and car radios by fixing them for friends at work, I leaned too. Many problems were tube swaps. SAMs Photofact manuals were plentiful. He ran a tube radio in the 62. I came across a 3 band Blaupunkt AM.FW.SW whose dial was in wavelength and was running it in a 1974 vehicle of mine.
    The tube radio used those things called vibrators to generate the high voltage. I did build a solid state vibrator for that car. Eventually transistor radios came out and they were basically 5 transistor designs. Still easy to fix, but dad was starting to struggle. We could never afford real test equipment. So, there was a tube tester, a voltmeter non-digital) and a battery eliminator as our tools. TV;s were pulled from the trash and we had lots of them because of that,

    I listened to SW radio when I went to bed as a kid.

    I really don't have a true HDTV, but there are lost of TVs in the house in lots of locations and a few that I don;t want to get rid of yet. An RCA and a Philco with a channel #1. When color started channel 2 was the first channel.

    I had a nice stereo tat I bought in pieces when I could afford stuff. I bought nice stuff. My parent bought be an all in one and I slowly replaced pieces, The turntable was the first purchase. There's some 78s around the house yet, but a friend of mine has some wax recordings. The stereo really needs some work now.

    I don't listen to music like I used to and my favorite was radio, I'd rather have piece and quiet except in the car. I TRIED to modify a Blaupunkt car radio to implement scan without a processor. Moderately successful until it was stolen. An amp was replace pound for pound with Lentils one day. Another time, with an alarm system, I managed to see people steeling a toolbox/amp and other stuff from the back of my car. The alarm was doing it;s thing.

    My real car break cam when my father's co-worker ran his car into a telephone pole and he sold it for dad for $25.00 USD in like 1973 or so, before I could drive.
    That was my car and you learn to appreciate it. So, there was body repair; replacement of panels; The heads got resurfaced (neighbor); carb re-buit; upolstered by me; brakes by me; exhaust by me; prepped for painting by me; I ported the intake manifold; an 8-track deck; stereo I had lots of down time. Later, I added an opto-electronic ignition system, new wires and plugs. One bug was elusive for a while. A crack in a rubber gas line connector at the tank.

    Later vehicles I did most of the repairs. A 1982 Toyota I ran for 17 years and out the AC system in from a box. I did some major stuff like the steering rack and clutch, harmonic balancer, yearly valve adjustments.

    I "gave it to the dealer" and it turned into a get-away car and the new owners stole VCR's and Lawn mowers. I did not even sell it for a $1.00, so title transfer got messed up. Almost everything worked but the mirror switch and the AC. It was past it;s 8 yr cycle of dieing. Like clockwork - every 8 years, it would blow two hoses. That Ac took 14 hours to install. Pumped down with homeade tools. Currently EPA certified for car AC and small appliance., so I can buy R-12, but no need or that anymore. I gave not made any investments into R-134 tools. I have a leak detector. I'd need new gauges, a recycler, and Nitrogen.

    When i wasn't "certified" and the regulations were in effect, I was able to replace the evaporator in a vehicle, pump it down and check for leaks and have someone else charge it, It way too much labor to take one out and replace it.

    I don;t have time for most car repairs anymore and not even an oil change, but I do some. The transverse mounted engines just make things miserable. So, I do some electrical stuff, replace filters and minor stuff. I do try to get the brake system flushed about every three years - something I used to do myself. I'll do battery diagnosis Brakes almost always means rotors. Coolant replacement is messy. Oil requires disposal. And the cars have gotten more reliable. The O2 sensors are in weird places etc.

    I still inspect the shops work where they leave off vacuum hoses and the like, but the concentration has been electrical on one vehicle particularly. In mine, I'd love to do a few things: A sub-woofer, add heated seats; replace the seat cover and create a car moves, brake on buzzer since it's difficult for me to see the light. Get the rims powder coated and some body work done and replace some fasteners that were destroyed in another repair and remove a broken off screw.

    I think my mechanical skills really started when I ran a lawn mower without oil and I was about 10 YO. I threw a rod and dad said, you broke it, you fix it, so we did.
    The mower threw a rod. I'm still using mowers that are 35 years old and converted a few to electronic ignition. Stuff got honed a bit when I was able to do metal machining. Skills in electronics, mechanics, thermo, programming all help.

    Minor woodwork is in there too.
     
  6. KeepItSimpleStupid

    KeepItSimpleStupid Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    I'd like to revisit the electronics/computer topic a bit, but I'd like to mention that I saw basic research being done with speech synthesis (Phonemes), scanning systems and even a laser scanner. I also worked in a semiconductor lab, but we were not making IC's or transistors. I even operated a keypunch machine. A machine that punches cards for computer input. Input was punched cards. Fed into computer. Output was the printer.
     
  7. atferrari

    atferrari Well-Known Member

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    I suggest you go with the above first. Once you understand binary, hoolean operations start to make sense easily. I found that working with paper and pencil the first examples of anything helps in grasping things.

    It took me some time to get used to this:

    By the way: I can say that 90% of what I read (about Electronics) was in English plus some in three other languages as French, Portuguese and Italian. Spanish (my mother tongue) came last.

    Ah, sorry, no Nepali...yet!;)
     

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