Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Solenoid valve controller

Status
Not open for further replies.

jok8r

New Member
Hi

I'm doing a project and need to build a system with solenoid valves, but I have very little knowlage of electronics. I need a circuit that can control 1 to 4 solenoid valves. The valves need to either be open for a certain time each be be contolled by switches.

I'm using 24V ac valves and I've read that I can run them on DC as well, I got a circuit from a friend that uses a 555 timer with a 4017 decade counter, he said I could maybe modify that and use op amps at the outputs to get the required voltage. Is this possible?

Or how can i achieve this?
 

Boncuk

New Member
Hi,

24V AC or DC valve solenoids draw considerable current (P=10W, at 24V I=0.42A). They can neither be driven by an OpAmp nor by a timer IC.

You should use driver triacs or transistors depending on the supply AC or DC.

A decimal counter will switch a single solenoid (again with driver) per output.

Using a diode network at the counter outputs you might switch any desired combination of solenoids.

Boncuk
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
If you drive an AC solenoid with DC, you will likely need to lower the voltage (or add a series resistor) to provide the required current. Without the AC impedance generated by the coil inductance, the current will be higher for a given DC voltage as compared to the same AC voltage.
 

user_88

Member
A solid state relay will probably have a sufficient current capacity to operate your AC relay.
There are SSRs which will operate from a +5 V source, and can be switched from TTL level voltages. There are other SSrs which have a wider range of switching voltage. Often, you can find various SSRs, in good condition, at surplus stores and markets.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top