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Software for 3D printing.

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thread starter #1
I recently acquired a Kossel type printer and wondered what people use to create objects. I started of using the free online Tinkercad from Autodesk but quickly outgrew that.

I've now started to play with OpenSCad (Open Source CAD) which uses a programming language to generate shapes.

A project I'm currently playing with needs 144 interrupts per revolution and so I am using three lines of holes to generate 3 separate interrupts. The code to generate this object is in the attached image.

It seems to be a very powerful and flexible program.

Mike. OpenSCAD.png
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
#2
I'm using Fusion 360 from Autodesk. I have OpenSCad, but only use it for viewing those files, maybe I should look a little deeper into it.
 

rjenkinsgb

Active Member
#5
Designspark Mechanical, from RS Components, is free and very good.
https://uk.rs-online.com/web/generalDisplay.html?id=designspark/designspark-mechanical

It's one of the few that allows you to directly set dimensions.
I made a replacement battery cover for an item, complete with "hinge" hooks and spring loaded latches & it clipped in place on the first go. Just done by measuring the required sizes from the device with vernier calipers.

(Using an Overlord Pro printer).
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thread starter #8
An interesting problem raised it's head. I added a motor mount hub and a fan to the item in the first post and tried to print it. The print was just a random mess. I wondered if maybe the model wasn't manifold so used a microsoft site to fix it. The file went from 3M to 170K and printed correctly. Anyone any idea what could be causing this?

Mike.
 

Dr_Doggy

Well-Known Member
#9
i find autodesk inventor great for making shapes for hardware models

a curved surface has a infinate amount of points ... but is scaled down based on resolution
you would want more points for a animation or graphic over a 1mm resolution of a 3d printer
... also not all obj files are decoded equally



printing a cube only needs 8points (of 3 vectors) = 24 bytes ... kinda mostly
 

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