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Simple Transformer Project

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anon815

New Member
Hi, I have a varsity project which requires me to build a simple transformer. I was just wondering if anyone had good ideas for a transformer core? Not much of a budget for this project so preferably something i can get from scrap metal etc..

I was thinking along the lines of just using a 8-10cm mild steel bolt or even washers (multiple washers insulated from each other to mimick a traditional transformer core). Is this a good idea?

Thanks
 
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stevez

Active Member
If you look in side a discarded computer power supply you may find an inductor that contains a core. Many of the inductors that I see in supplies like that are toroidal inductors - google on that and you should see a picture. It looks like a ring or donut with windings.

You could strip the windings off - and just add your own. If a single winding you might just add your own over top.

You might also find an AM loopstick antenna with a rod or bar core.

Lots of ways to handle this one. I think the solid iron/steel might work to demonstrate the principles but probably not well. In transformer cores are laminated or sintered so that the iron is not a continuous conductor.

Amidon Associates, among others, sell toroidal cores.
 
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anon815

New Member
If you look in side a discarded computer power supply you may find an inductor that contains a core. Many of the inductors that I see in supplies like that are toroidal inductors - google on that and you should see a picture. It looks like a ring or donut with windings.

You could strip the windings off - and just add your own. If a single winding you might just add your own over top.

You might also find an AM loopstick antenna with a rod or bar core.

Lots of ways to handle this one. I think the solid iron/steel might work to demonstrate the principles but probably not well. In transformer cores are laminated or sintered so that the iron is not a continuous conductor.

Amidon Associates, among others, sell toroidal cores.
Thanks, I'll def. try the computer power supply idea.

With the solid iron/steel core idea, i thought this wouldn't affect the performance too much. I think the supply to test our project is only 10V peak to peak and the turns ratio is only in the single digits. Will it affect it that much??
 

Sceadwian

Banned
It will work, you'll find out how well when you build it though.
 

grim

New Member
what is your transformer for?
 

grim

New Member
mains connected or signal?
 

Hero999

Banned
What frequency and power level do you require?

Ferrite is good for >20kHz but useless at 50/60Hz.
 

anon815

New Member
it's a signal generator 10V peak to peak with 50ohms internal resistance..

my transformer is supposed to be 9khz and the step down ratio is something small like 3:1
 
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How about something like this? You can use the ferrite cores scavenged from a TV horizontal deflection xfmr. That ferrite is good to about 0.6Wb/sq M (Bsat) and will work nicely at 9.0KHz. Use CMOS HEX inverters as base drivers, and you won't have to worry about loading down the multivibrator.

fc= 1 / (2ln(RC))
 

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