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RTD Vs Thermocouple

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ohadne

New Member
Hi,
I wanted to know how does RTD (Resistance Temptature Detector) works? and how Thermocouple works?

and what is the difference between these two temp sensors?

Thanks,
Ohad.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
THermocouple- very high temperatures possible, relative temperature measurement only between two points, cheaper, more durable

RTD- more expensive, absolute temperature measurement, the most stable, the most accurate, linear (if you use the right material of course)
 
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Leftyretro

New Member
Thermocouple utilizes Seebeck effect that says the dissimilar metals will product a small voltage proportional to temperature.

A RTD is a wound resistance wire (usually platinum) that changes resistance with temperature.


Lefty
 
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ohadne

New Member
Hi Leftyretro,

yes i read about seeback effect, but i don't understand what happens to the metals when the temp is going up or down.
i mean to the current carriers (or electrical energy), are their number changed due to changes in temp?
and that is the reason for voltage that is created between the two junctions?

Thanks for your help.
 

ohadne

New Member
THermocouple- very high temperatures possible, relative temperature measurement only between two points, cheaper, more durable

RTD- more expensive, absolute temperature measurement, the most stable, the most accurate, linear (if you use the right material of course)
thanks for the info!
 

Leftyretro

New Member
Hi Leftyretro,

yes i read about seeback effect, but i don't understand what happens to the metals when the temp is going up or down.
i mean to the current carriers (or electrical energy), are their number changed due to changes in temp?
and that is the reason for voltage that is created between the two junctions?

Thanks for your help.
You would have to research for the physics involved, much more in depth then can be put here. Lots on the Internet:

Thermoelectric effect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://www.electro-tech-online.com/custompdfs/2009/05/z021-032.pdf
 
Last edited:

ohadne

New Member
Hi All,

What does it mean when is written on electical device's specification the following:

Isolation Voltage: 3000V

Thanks.
Ohad.
 
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