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RF on veroboards

I know breadboards are not good for RF transmission. If i change the circuits to using veroboards, will it improve the performance?

If no, then what is the best way to test an RF receiver and transmitter?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Spectacular Butter said:
I know breadboards are not good for RF transmission. If i change the circuits to using veroboards, will it improve the performance?

If no, then what is the best way to test an RF receiver and transmitter?
Veroboard isn't good for RF, for the same reasons as breadboards (although breadboards are far worse). If you remove all the unused pieces of track it may well be OK though, obviously it all depends on your exact layout (just as it would with a PCB).

What sort of frequencies are you talking about?.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi Butter,
I just finished making a 3-transistor plus regulator FM transmitter with Veroboard and it works fine. I used a tight layout, proper RF bypassing and cut unused and extra-length tracks.
I wouldn't attempt such a high frequency circuit on a breadboard.
My Veroboard layout closely resembles a pcb so I doubt they would operate much differently.

What performance details do you want to test?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
audioguru said:
Hi Butter,
I just finished making a 3-transistor plus regulator FM transmitter with Veroboard and it works fine. I used a tight layout, proper RF bypassing and cut unused and extra-length tracks.
How about posting all the details in the 'Electronics Projects' forum?.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi Butter,
433MHz is pretty high for Veroboard.
I cut the tracks with a drill-bit, I don't remove any. Sometimes I ground unused tracks and use them as a shield.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Spectacular Butter said:
its 433 MHz. How do u guys effectively remove all the copper tracks?
I agree with audioguru - 433MHz is rather high (UHF), are you actually wanting to build the 433MHz part, or simply use a ready built licence free module?.

To remove a section of track I first cut either end with the standard cutting tool. Then heavily tin right along the track - making sure it gets far too much heat - the tinned track then pulls off easily and cleanly, you might need to get a sharp blade under one corner to start it going.
 

zachtheterrible

Active Member
just make a pcb :roll:

if you're anywhere near being serious about electronics, you should learn how to make PCBs, they're sooooo simple, cheap, and easy! at first i thought the same thing as you probably do, pcb's are a pain and they're expensive, i couldn'tve been more wrong.
 

pike

Member
What method do you use zach? I find it almost impossible to get the p-n-p to work. just doesn't stick even after cleaning with alcohol, pure acetone. I just cant be bothered now :evil: .

If not just use the unused tracks up like a ground plane (or shield) like audioguru said.

Unlike zach i dont have that persistent, will powered motivation to bother anymore attempts with homemade PCB. Zach mate, you've got some balls there :lol:
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Spectacular Butter said:
Nigel Goodwin said:
I agree with audioguru - 433MHz is rather high (UHF), are you actually wanting to build the 433MHz part, or simply use a ready built licence free module?.
i am using RF modules.
In that case I don't see any problem, the 433MHz part isn't even connected to the board.

However, the module manufacturers do specify NOT to use veroboard, but as I see it, if you remove the unused strips then it's no different to a PCB.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi Nigel,
With Veroboard, have you ever used very small wire to make jumpers so that you have 2 jumpers in one hole?
Because I used 22 guage wire I have always had a single jumper in a hole, requiring the strip to be longer when making a "T" connection.

I have recently switched to using 24 guage wire to make jumpers since their length doesn't have to be so precise to fit. Maybe I'll try 30 guage wire jumpers for low currents, double them in holes and end up with a smaller layout.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
audioguru said:
Hi Nigel,
With Veroboard, have you ever used very small wire to make jumpers so that you have 2 jumpers in one hole?
Because I used 22 guage wire I have always had a single jumper in a hole, requiring the strip to be longer when making a "T" connection.
No I haven't, generally I try any make my layouts very repeatable, and easily copied from a picture - multiple components in a hole would detract from that.

However, it's a nice idea 8) I'll bear it in mind!.
 

stevez

Active Member
I was introduced to Manhattan Style construction at an amateur radio meeting recently. It's nothing new - just wasnt' something I noticed. Apparently it works well for RF work though I've no idea to what limits. You make little islands (my term) of PC board that you glue to a larger PC board. The larger board is ground - the islands are component connection points. Those who use this method claim it's pretty easy to make them and easy to make changes. I intend to try it soon.

Exmples can be seen on njqrp.org website
 

zachtheterrible

Active Member
hey pike, check out this website http://www.fullnet.com/u/tomg/gooteepc.htm

ive never used PNP, ive heard it sux though. i use toner transfer method with picture paper. Staples picture paper works great, that is if you staples in australia?? you might have to experiment with different kinds of paper. i use regular ol' ferric chloride for an etchant and it works great.

i haven't been able to use a laser printer to print out onto the picture paper because it never works, so what i do is print out the artwork on a regular printer, and then take it to a copy shop and copy it off a machine, it seems to work really good. i have never been able to get perfectly straight lines, they are always a tiny bit jagged, this is because the picture gets a tiny bit distorted in the print, and then copy process. i really wish i could use a laser printer.

it takes me about 1/2 hour to get a PCB. for the simplicity, the results are spectacular :lol:
 

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