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Regarding Non-Conformance Report (NCR) report

alandaniel132

New Member
As an electronics test engineer, I am given several Non-Conformance Reports (NCR) from the manufacturing line.

What should I do next? What is the standard procedure or protocol I need to follow?
 

Papabravo

Well-Known Member
It depends on the expectations of the company that you work for. I think the first step would be to investigate the circumstances detailed in the report to see if you agree with the factual situation. If you do agree, then you might want to start considering remedial actions. In the absence of more detailed information, it is hard to know what to advise you to do.
 

sagor1

Active Member
Sounds like another homework question. This member has posted a few different "hypothetical" questions already, all related to defects or quality control.
An electronics engineer dealing with a manufacturing "line" would know what to do...
Please re-post in the homework section...
 

Papabravo

Well-Known Member
If the TS wants to play pretend and post in GEC, I don't mind as long as he doesn't expect a magnum opus in response. I'm always good for a platitude or two. If he still does not know what to do, then he is being paid more than he is worth.
 

For The Popcorn

Active Member
Here's what he said in another thread:

For an interview of a role "Electronics Technician".

Is there any material I can read on this topic?

Seems like he's not well suited for such a position if he's expected to have the initiative to investigate and solve problems.
 

sagor1

Active Member
Here's what he said in another thread:



Seems like he's not well suited for such a position if he's expected to have the initiative to investigate and solve problems.
Yes, it may be that the TS may be trying to get a job in the field, and has acquired typical interview questions. Getting answers on this forum will not help him (her?) keep that job if they can't at least attempt answers to those questions themselves.
I may be wrong about this, but all the TS questions seem to point to typical interview questions or "homework" type of questions for a specific "quality control" class...
Just an opinion. Answers to TS questions can be varied by a huge amount, depending on actual situation. A specific question for a specific problem would be easier to believe than these generic wide range types of questions.
I have no issue with helping with a typical "homework" or interview question, but specifics of an actual problem would go a lot farther than generic questions.
 

For The Popcorn

Active Member
I'm kind of amazed at the number of engineering students and even engineers who have almost no real-world experience and little insight into either how things work or what an engineer does.

When I was young, I was always taking things apart just to see what was inside and to get some idea how things work. Taking apart a pump. Unwinding a transformer. Working on old TVs. Hands-on stuff, and I do it to this day. I drive some of my friends crazy by taking apart failed LED bulbs and even fixing them. One friend offered to buy me a case of LED bulbs if I would stop taking them apart! I don't take them apart because I can't afford a new bulb; I take them apart to see how the circuit design has evolved and what's failed. If a capacitor has blown or an LED has a black spot of death, why not repair it and keep it out of the landfill?

Sometimes taking "junk" apart results in useful parts (not that I salvage many components) or seeing some method of doing things that I'd never considered. It all adds to the experience base that helps troubleshoot problems and understand common problem areas.
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
As an electronics test engineer, I am given several Non-Conformance Reports (NCR) from the manufacturing line.

What should I do next? What is the standard procedure or protocol I need to follow?
I suggest just as an overview you give this a read.

As an engineer in a manufacturing environment you should know what to do.

Ron
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I am given several Non-Conformance Reports (NCR) from the manufacturing line.

What should I do next?

What is the standard procedure or protocol I need to follow?

The process will be specific to the company you work for.

If that company is ISO9001* accredited, there will be a formal written procedure which defines the steps to take for all actions and operations within that company.

(* From bad memory of 20 years ago).

I may be wrong, but I get the impression that alandaniel132 is still in school or college and has not yet had a real job.
In preparation for his first job interview, some "Careers Adviser" has primed him with these questions as indicative of the type of thing which will be asked of him at the interview.
If that is the case, he needs a new careers adviser.
No company in its right mind is going to ask questions like these of someone fresh out of college with no industrial experience.

JimB
 

Tony Stewart

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
As an electronics test engineer, I am given several Non-Conformance Reports (NCR) from the manufacturing line.

What should I do next? What is the standard procedure or protocol I need to follow?
Get your ISO9001 procedures and follow them. They must be documented to show the reports for Root Cause Analysis (RCA) and Corrective Action Plan to get sign-off on the NCR.

 

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