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Question about choosing PICs and development hardware

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jbmillard

Member
I read the FAQ sections about choosing a PIC. It doesn't appear to discuss the PIC24. Being very new to this, can someone explain why one would (or would not) choose the PIC24 over the PIC18 or others.

I'm planning a project that will have to read three to four analog inputs, do a lot of math (floating point), read/write to an EEPROM, use an LCD display, have a few buttons and probably a USB interface.

What I'm looking for is a development board that can get me started learning about PICs. I've been reading the PIC24 book, "Learning to Fly the PIC24", so I'm leaning toward the PIC24 and Explorer 16 board. Has anyone here used the board?

I just want to know if I'm missing something before I shell out the money.

Thanks!

Brad
 

kchriste

New Member
Forum Supporter
I read the FAQ sections about choosing a PIC. It doesn't appear to discuss the PIC24. Being very new to this, can someone explain why one would (or would not) choose the PIC24 over the PIC18 or others.
The PIC18 is cheaper and there more code examples, especially in assembly. The nice thing about the 24F over the 18F is the lack of banked memory.
I'm planning a project that will have to read three to four analog inputs, do a lot of math (floating point), read/write to an EEPROM, use an LCD display, have a few buttons and probably a USB interface.
Except for the floating point, the 18F series should handle it OK. Even floating point can be done on the 18F but it does slow things down. You could probably avoid floating point altogether by clever programming techniques. ie: Instead of saying 1.234 + 3.141 = 4.375 you could say 1234 + 3141 = 4375 in fixed point and just add the decimal point in at the end.
 
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