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pulse output

arivel

Member
arivel, Please post details of the relays you plan to use..
there are many on the market, it is difficult to make a choice. now I'm focused on the circuit because if I can't complete that, it's useless to go and look for the relay.
why did you ask me this question? , is it because of the power supply voltage?
 

eTech

Active Member
there are many on the market, it is difficult to make a choice. now I'm focused on the circuit because if I can't complete that, it's useless to go and look for the relay.
why did you ask me this question? , is it because of the power supply voltage?
Because in order to design a latching relay driver, there are specific timing requirements (such as length of time the coil should be energized to ensure latch) as well as drive voltage/current requirements.
 

ChrisP58

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
there are many on the market, it is difficult to make a choice. now I'm focused on the circuit because if I can't complete that, it's useless to go and look for the relay.
why did you ask me this question? , is it because of the power supply voltage?
In addition to what eTech said, the type of circuitry needed is dependent on the type of latching relay. You have been asking about single coil latching relays, but there are also dual coil relays. The circuitry needed to drive the dual coil type is simpler.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
That diagram shows + and - power linked together?
A dual-coil relay is far simpler to drive, you just pulse one or the other coils.
 

arivel

Member
it's just a very simplified double feed.
of course there are diode bridges, stabilizer circuits, and capacitors.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
it's just a very simplified double feed.
of course there are diode bridges, stabilizer circuits, and capacitors.
Then your schematic is so overly simplified that we cannot comment whether or not it will work. It is so simplified that it shows + and - power supply connected together. EVERY Person with electrical experience will tell you it won't work snd possibly damage your power supply and/or cause a fire. So, you'll either have to assume it won't work and redraw, add some detail so we can give a real opinion, or try it while protecting from fire or damaged power supply.
 

arivel

Member
do you know a transformer with two secondaries joined together by a central socket and two diode bridges with a common output?
 

eTech

Active Member
it's just a very simplified double feed.
of course there are diode bridges, stabilizer circuits, and capacitors.
I understood what your diagram meant to show. :) Post #26 makes a good point. You should consider a dual coil latch relay because the drive circuitry is simpler.
 

ChrisP58

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
do you know a transformer with two secondaries joined together by a central socket and two diode bridges with a common output?
A line frequency AC output transformer can be setup with two diodes to make positive and negative DC voltages.
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Post #32, figure 2 is incorrect. It produces two positive outputs, not one positive and one negative. The lower diode bridge is connected incorrectly.

Besides being correct, figure 1 is a better circuit because it achieves the same results with fewer parts and greater efficiency.

ak
 

arivel

Member
Post #32, figure 2 is incorrect. It produces two positive outputs, not one positive and one negative. The lower diode bridge is connected incorrectly.

Besides being correct, figure 1 is a better circuit because it achieves the same results with fewer parts and greater efficiency.

ak
ok thanks, what you wrote I'll check it out calmly.
however what interests me most is to know if I can drive the relay coil in this way but not only.
Is the relay coil able to discharge the overvoltage after shutdown?
 

arivel

Member
I'm sorry but the proposed circuit cannot work.
I make an example with the attached circuit which is the same as the one proposed. if the push pull or the half bridge H supplies the coil with negative voltage when the relay switches off it must discharge through the indicated path but is blocked by one of the internal diodes of the diode bridge. the same thing happens when the positive voltage is supplied to the relay coil but following another path. It should be noted that the darlington phus pull pairs or the half bridges H have inside them the diodes which are arranged as in the drawing in the box.
 

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atferrari

Well-Known Member
I'm sorry but the proposed circuit cannot work.
I make an example with the attached circuit which is the same as the one proposed. if the push pull or the half bridge H supplies the coil with negative voltage when the relay switches off it must discharge through the indicated path but is blocked by one of the internal diodes of the diode bridge. the same thing happens when the positive voltage is supplied to the relay coil but following another path. It should be noted that the darlington phus pull pairs or the half bridges H have inside them the diodes which are arranged as in the drawing in the box.
What are those bridge's "internal diodes"?
 

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