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power supply

peter g

Member
hi all, i want to build this circuit, but don't want to use the power supply indicated on the attached schematic. can someone come up with a 0-100vdc p/s i can use instead? also, where to attach it? thanks.
 

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dougy83

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The schematic you attached generates the 10V-100V supply, depending on the switch setting. To make your own supply, the normal way would be to use a SMPS IC and wire up something similar to that in the schematic. Alternately, you could get the microcontroller to drive a transistor/inductor/diode and regulate the supply.

If you didn't find what you wanted in the SMPS design page above, what are you after?
 

ChrisP58

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
the p/s ithats indicated requires winding a special transformer. i'am trying to avoid that.
Well, technically it's a coupled inductor, but it is a custom part.

What info is given about T1 in the article? I can imagine it being a very simple item to build. Take core X and add two windings. Once the materials have been gathered, it'd take only a few minutes to wind by hand.
 

dougy83

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
the design page shows p/s to only 48v. i want 100v. what about a linear supply?
The schematic seems to be showing it going to 100V. The split inductor allows a higher voltage than the MC34063 could handle on its switch/collector pin.
the p/s ithats indicated requires winding a special transformer. i'am trying to avoid that.
If you want to just use an off-the-shelf inductor, you'll want to use an external switch (FET/BJT transistor) that can handle the 100V. You can drive it with the MC34063 shown in the schematic, or use a different IC, e.g. UC3843.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
From some photos I've found, the inductor is just a pot core around 25 - 30mm diameter (based on the proportions of that relative to the LCD bezel).

They are very easy to wind and use, just count the turns on to the bobbin as you wind it then put the ferrite half cores around it. I've used dozens of them in various projects over the years.

Example parts:

Ideally you should find a parts list (or buy a copy of the original article) that gives the correct core material or type number, as there are several variations in each size, with different magnetic properties.

Using the correct, original transformer parts is by far the easiest way of getting that circuit to work - and it does explicitly say in numerous places that the test voltage goes up to 100V with that design.

A ferrite toroid core may work as an alternative, but without knowing the material type of the original core I would not have a clue what to suggest..
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
the original pot core is ferrite.
Yep, but there are various grades of ferrite with different magnetic properties relating to inductance and suitable for different frequencies. Also, the cores are made with different air gaps, which drastically change the inductance per turn of the winding.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
i think its unnessiarily complicated. there should be an easier way. what about using the attached supply?

It's vastly inferior, and probably more complicated, but feel free to give it a try.

There's less parts in the original circuit, other than those for setting the output voltage - the 555 one isn't even regulated.
 

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