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power supply blinking... caps?

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parkerbeder

New Member
on checking the circuit again, I think it's the thermal protection kicking it off. The thermistor is right next to a 36K 5 watt resistor, that is getting pretty hot (my cheap ir thermometer was saying 200 degrees F. ) can a guy just bend the thermistor away from the resistor, or is this standard procedure to put a resistor next to it, to represent the power running through the circuit? lastly, might it just be that the resistor is bad? it's a 5% ceramic resistor, I thought ceramic resistors almost never quit...

anyway, just some ideas.

Anyone have a clue what might be up?

Thanks again!!!
-Parker
 

aquamon

Member
Dude, you solved your own question:
what's the best way to test a cap, if you don't have a 'capmeter'? I always used to think you could just test for continuity, if there is any, it' stoast. is that a fair assumption? There were two caps that were bulged in the supply, out of 15-20
between one of the ~ leads and the + or - lead, it will read a number for a breif instant, then go to 1 (no continuity) no matter which direction i'm going (positive or negative lead from the meter to either ~ or +/- lead.

Also,
on checking the circuit again, I think it's the thermal protection kicking it off. The thermistor is right next to a 36K 5 watt resistor, that is getting pretty hot (my cheap ir thermometer was saying 200 degrees F. ) can a guy just bend the thermistor away from the resistor, or is this standard procedure to put a resistor next to it, to represent the power running through the circuit? lastly, might it just be that the resistor is bad? it's a 5% ceramic resistor, I thought ceramic resistors almost never quit...

anyway, just some ideas.

Anyone have a clue what might be up?

Thanks again!!!
-Parker
Maybe you want to put a fan on it and see if that makes a difference, I would move the "therm" from the ceramic, and they do go bad (O.C.).
 
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