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PIC sense

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Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
stephenpic said:
Hi,

Im new to the whole PIC scene but im very interested. Im looking at buying the following item from Maplin Electronics:

http://www.maplin.co.uk/products/module.asp?CartID=031230000713343&moduleno=37192

Can anyone comment on how good this item would be for a 'newbie' to PIC's?

Also how hard would it be to connect a Distance Measuring Sensor and send the results from this sensor to a computer through the serial port?

Thanks very much.
I've never actually seen one, but it looks pretty reasonable.

You might also consider an 'IceBreaker' from Magenta, this is a 16F877 based kit that works as an ICE (In Circuit Emulator) - it lets you set breakpoints and step through programs. It's a little more expensive than the Velleman kit - but it includes a breadboard and LCD module.

As for a 'Distance Measuring Sensor' it should be simple enough to connect to any PIC and send the results to a PC via RS232. Obviously it all depends on what the sensor supplies, and having the PIC software to read it.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
stephenpic said:
Hi,

Im new to the whole PIC scene but im very interested. Im looking at buying the following item from Maplin Electronics:

http://www.maplin.co.uk/products/module.asp?CartID=031230000713343&moduleno=37192

Can anyone comment on how good this item would be for a 'newbie' to PIC's?

Also how hard would it be to connect a Distance Measuring Sensor and send the results from this sensor to a computer through the serial port?

Thanks very much.
I've never actually seen one, but it looks pretty reasonable.

You might also consider an 'IceBreaker' from Magenta at http://www.magenta2000.co.uk, this is a 16F877 based kit that works as an ICE (In Circuit Emulator) - it lets you set breakpoints and step through programs. It's a little more expensive than the Velleman kit - but it includes a breadboard and LCD module.

As for a 'Distance Measuring Sensor' it should be simple enough to connect to any PIC and send the results to a PC via RS232. Obviously it all depends on what the sensor supplies, and having the PIC software to read it.
 

stephenpic

New Member
The sensor I was looking at buying is the following:

'Sharp GP2D12
Distance Measuring Sensor
Infrared distance measuring sensor accurately determines range to target between 10cm and 80cm.

Supplied with 12” connection lead (26 gauge stranded wire) one end of which has a machine crimped JST connector and the other end of the lead is left free.

Can be used as a proximity detector to detect objects between 0cm and 130cm.'

I chose this sensor because of the distance it can reach. Although I only plan to use around 10-20 cm distance it seems to be the lowest sensor at a reasonable price without going into tiny measurements such as 1 inch.

Would I be right in thinking that after programming the PIC and Im sure everything worked it would be a matter of connecting the sensor to the pins on the pic and a power supply to some of the other pins on the pic and a RS232 connector onto some of the pins?

Am I being a bit crude and missing vital components here?

Thanks. Ill look into the kit you recommended now :)
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
stephenpic said:
The sensor I was looking at buying is the following:

'Sharp GP2D12
Distance Measuring Sensor
Infrared distance measuring sensor accurately determines range to target between 10cm and 80cm.

Supplied with 12” connection lead (26 gauge stranded wire) one end of which has a machine crimped JST connector and the other end of the lead is left free.

Can be used as a proximity detector to detect objects between 0cm and 130cm.'

I chose this sensor because of the distance it can reach. Although I only plan to use around 10-20 cm distance it seems to be the lowest sensor at a reasonable price without going into tiny measurements such as 1 inch.

Would I be right in thinking that after programming the PIC and Im sure everything worked it would be a matter of connecting the sensor to the pins on the pic and a power supply to some of the other pins on the pic and a RS232 connector onto some of the pins?

Am I being a bit crude and missing vital components here?

Thanks. Ill look into the kit you recommended now :)
I haven't played with one of these Sharp sensors, but I've often thought of getting one to have a go with!. From what I can remember, there are two distinctly different types - the difference being in their outputs. I remember thinking one was much easier to interface to, but I can't remember what the difference was now!.

You connection suggestion is pretty well correct, have a look at my tutorials at http://www.winpicprog.co.uk, they will give you an idea how to connect things, plus fully working RS232 hardware and software.

In answer to your other question, I've got an IceBreaker I bought from Magenta some time ago - I probably use it less than I should do, but it is extremely useful sometimes - for your purposes, it should be great.
 

Exo

Active Member
stephenpic said:
Hi,

Im new to the whole PIC scene but im very interested. Im looking at buying the following item from Maplin Electronics:

http://www.maplin.co.uk/products/module.asp?CartID=031230000713343&moduleno=37192

Can anyone comment on how good this item would be for a 'newbie' to PIC's?

Also how hard would it be to connect a Distance Measuring Sensor and send the results from this sensor to a computer through the serial port?

Thanks very much.
It's a velleman kit. If you search it on velleman's site (www.velleman.be) you'll find a manual about it including scematics so you can make it yourself. You can even download the software for it from there site.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
stephenpic said:
The sensor I was looking at buying is the following:

'Sharp GP2D12
Distance Measuring Sensor
Infrared distance measuring sensor accurately determines range to target between 10cm and 80cm.

Supplied with 12” connection lead (26 gauge stranded wire) one end of which has a machine crimped JST connector and the other end of the lead is left free.

Can be used as a proximity detector to detect objects between 0cm and 130cm.'

I chose this sensor because of the distance it can reach. Although I only plan to use around 10-20 cm distance it seems to be the lowest sensor at a reasonable price without going into tiny measurements such as 1 inch.

Would I be right in thinking that after programming the PIC and Im sure everything worked it would be a matter of connecting the sensor to the pins on the pic and a power supply to some of the other pins on the pic and a RS232 connector onto some of the pins?

Am I being a bit crude and missing vital components here?

Thanks. Ill look into the kit you recommended now :)
I haven't played with one of these Sharp sensors, but I've often thought of getting one to have a go with!. From what I can remember, there are two distinctly different types - the difference being in their outputs. I remember thinking one was much easier to interface to, but I can't remember what the difference was now!.

You connection suggestion is pretty well correct, have a look at my tutorials at http://www.winpicprog.co.uk, they will give you an idea how to connect things, plus fully working RS232 hardware and software.

In answer to your other question, I've got an IceBreaker I bought from Magenta some time ago - I probably use it less than I should do, but it is extremely useful sometimes - for your purposes, it should be great. I found their service friendly and prompt, I'm quite happy to recommend them.
 

stephenpic

New Member
Exo thanks for the info, although Im not to sure if i actualy want to build the programmer itself, im more interested in the PIC side of things.

Nigel I dont supose you would want to sell me your ice breaker kit :p

With the sensors would it simply send data for instance like '01' being say 0.1cm away and such like or would it be far more complicated?


Thanks
 

stephenpic

New Member
Another question :p How hard would it be to attach a small speaker to make sound?( Different pitched beeps would be fine )

Thanks
 

Exo

Active Member
stephenpic said:
Exo thanks for the info, although Im not to sure if i actualy want to build the programmer itself, im more interested in the PIC side of things.
Since it is a velleman kit you still have to build it yourself.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
stephenpic said:
Nigel I dont supose you would want to sell me your ice breaker kit :p

With the sensors would it simply send data for instance like '01' being say 0.1cm away and such like or would it be far more complicated?
Sorry, I still use it sometimes :lol:

Have a look at the datasheet at http://personal.telefonica.terra.es/web/x-robotics/downloads/datasheets/gp2d12.pdf, the device you mentioned gives an analogue output related to distance. This makes it easy to use with the IceBreaker (which uses a 16F877, with in-built analogue to digital converters). To make beeping noises you can simply feed a small speaker through a capacitor (and possibly a limiting resisitor) from a PIC output pin - you simply switch the pin up and down at the frequency you want, for as long as you want.
 

stephenpic

New Member
Thats great!

Thanks for all your help nigel. I just have to wait for my money to transfer from paypal to my bank and then I can buy the kit :)

I just read the datasheet and is it me or does the devise only tell you if a object is at a certain specified length, for instance you couldn't simply move an object towards and further away from the device but simply have it at a certain distance or NOT at a certain distance? Maybe im just going crazy...

Thanks
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
stephenpic said:
I just read the datasheet and is it me or does the devise only tell you if a object is at a certain specified length, for instance you couldn't simply move an object towards and further away from the device but simply have it at a certain distance or NOT at a certain distance? Maybe im just going crazy...
That's the other version, the one you mentioned gives an analogue output related to distance.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
stephenpic said:
Hi,

Analog shows what sort of data? Readable text...hex...asci?

THanks
None, it's just an analogue voltage - according to the datasheet I posted the URL for, from 0.6V to 3.1V (from my memory). You could read this voltage using one of the analogue to digital converters in a 16F877, this will give you a 10 bit number - from 0 to 1023, representing 0-5V, assuming you use the 5V rail as the A2D reference.
 

stephenpic

New Member
Hmm,

I think Im going to wait until i get my actual kit before asking any more questions so i can better understand how the PIC works.

Ill keep you updated on my progress.... Thanks for your help.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
stephenpic said:
Hmm,

I think Im going to wait until i get my actual kit before asking any more questions so i can better understand how the PIC works.

Ill keep you updated on my progress.... Thanks for your help.
If you've already got the sensor, stick a voltmeter on the output - you should be able to see the reading change as you move an obstacle in front of it.
 

stephenpic

New Member
No i dont have it yet :)

The people who sell the ice breaker kit said it would be very hard for me to put together with no soldering experience ( which i dont have ) and that I would need help.... any ideas?

Thanks
 
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