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Phone replacement battery

jack0987

Member
I need to replace my phone battery. RS wants a bit of money for these. They appear to be three AAA batteries.

How could I just make up my own three pack?PhoneBattery.jpg
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
By buying three batteries the same size - if you can find them - if they are AAA size, then no problem. Simply solder the batteries together and apply heat shrink, or if you can't source that, then insulating tape.

Or just buy a ready built pack, which are freely available at low cost - just don't buy from Radio Shack.
 

jack0987

Member
Just looking for guidance. Have not used this phone for a while and it is quite old.

I opened the pack and they are definitely AAA size wired in series.
For my phone, I had to change the polarity of the RS pack.

So I just get three AAA 1.5v Ni-MH batteries and wire them in series? Do they have to be NI-MH?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Just looking for guidance. Have not used this phone for a while and it is quite old.

I opened the pack and they are definitely AAA size wired in series.
For my phone, I had to change the polarity of the RS pack.

So I just get three AAA 1.5v Ni-MH batteries and wire them in series? Do they have to be NI-MH?
Best to Use Ni-Mh as that's what the existing ones are, in any case Ni-Cd would probably be rare these days.
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Each cell is a 1.2 volt NiMh battery and the 3 cells in series are 3.6 volts. The battery charge/maintain system is designed for that voltage and battery type. Years ago, before the demise of Radio Shack locally those packs were not very expensive. I used a few and like mentioned, had to reverse the polarity of my connectors. That said using a simple Google of "3.6 Volt NiMh Phone batteries Amazon" gets me a few dozen hits with most in the $5.00 to $7.00 range which I see as cheap and easier then building a pack and needing to solder to batteries which are normally tied using a metal strip and small spot welds. Considering price I would just buy rather than build.

Ron
 

Externet

Active Member
Done it several times to other items using 3 cells for 3.6V : Replaced with a single lithium ion cell, salvaged or new.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Done it several times to other items using 3 cells for 3.6V : Replaced with a single lithium ion cell, salvaged or new.
Bit on the dangerous side, as Li-Ion easily burst in to flames when incorrectly charged - and a crude Ni-Mh charger in a phone (just a resistor from a higher voltage) is probably as bad as you could get :nailbiting:
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I do this all the time. There is no big deal replacing the Ni-cds with Ni-mH of a higher capacity. The last pack looks like yours: https://www.batteryspace.com/CustomNiMH3.6v2200mAhAAw/2APolyswitchand622AwgOpenWires.aspx

3AA and 2200 mAh with wire leads. Yours may be AAA.

After doing it for many years (1975 for Ni-Cds) I was using tabbed batteries. Don't. get the ones with wire leads.

I have the part numbers for that connector and pins somewhere for your connector. I'm in bed now. You can "sometimes'` cut and splice with heat shrink. in an emergency. You can sometimes renew the pin housings.

I have a vtech phone that uses your connector and a vtech baby monitor that uses another, so I can find the part numbers/

The problem is the crimper is expensive. You'll pay about $70.00 USD for a cheap nice crimper.

I usually label the pack and it looks like I used the wrong company name. Name date, pack #. I always look for a battery with a warranty.

Used correctly, I've gotten 7-8 years out of a Ni-mH battery and they die at the same time.

A roll of Kapton tape comes in handy especially for those doors that like to fall off.


FWIW: They do cell the shrinkable sleeves.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I do this all the time. There is no big deal replacing the Ni-cds with Ni-mH of a higher capacity. The last pack looks like yours: https://www.batteryspace.com/CustomNiMH3.6v2200mAhAAw/2APolyswitchand622AwgOpenWires.aspx

3AA and 2200 mAh with wire leads. Yours may be AAA.

After doing it for many years (1975 for Ni-Cds) I was using tabbed batteries. Don't. get the ones with wire leads.

I have the part numbers for that connector and pins somewhere for your connector. I'm in bed now. You can "sometimes'` cut and splice with heat shrink. in an emergency. You can sometimes renew the pin housings.

I have a vtech phone that uses your connector and a vtech baby monitor that uses another, so I can find the part numbers/

The problem is the crimper is expensive. You'll pay about $70.00 USD for a cheap nice crimper.

I usually label the pack and it looks like I used the wrong company name. Name date, pack #. I always look for a battery with a warranty.

Used correctly, I've gotten 7-8 years out of a Ni-mH battery and they die at the same time.

A roll of Kapton tape comes in handy especially for those doors that like to fall off.


FWIW: They do cell the shrinkable sleeves.
Or even sell them :D - nice Freudian slip!

We keep various sizes at work, as we do a lot of battery replacements, and to that end also have a battery spot welder (cheap from China).

Just a word of caution about sleeving for battery packs - it's not soft and rubbery like normal heat shrink, it's hard and shiny - it's important to gently heat it, and not get it too hot, or you melt holes through it. It does make a nice professional job though, looks a lot better than sticky tape.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Your connector housing is a JST EHR-2: https://www.digikey.com/products/en/connectors-interconnects/rectangular-connectors-housings/319?k=455-1000

Pins: https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/jst-sales-america-inc/SEH-001T-P0.6/455-1042-1-ND/527266

I think these https://www.hozan.co.jp/E/catalog/Crimpers/P-706.html are the crimpers you want. The TE connectivity ones were like $20.00 back in the 1980's .

It' the AMP service tool II. Here's the specs. https://www.te.com/commerce/DocumentDelivery/DDEController?Action=srchrtrv&DocNm=696202&DocType=Customer+Drawing&DocLang=English Lots of distrbuters have the right part number, BUT the WRONG picture. BE CAREFUL.

This

1575221134955.png

696202-1/crimp-tool-hand-open-closed-barrel/dp/22C6015?CMP=AFC-ECIA


is not

696202-1/A30574-ND/440285
1575221343749.png




1575221134955.png1575221343749.png
Has the same part number, but the picture is wrong. I've tried many times to correct it. So. Maybe Newark/Farnell is not the place to buy from if you expect the data to be correct.
 

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