Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

object triangulation/ tracking

Status
Not open for further replies.

sureshot45

New Member
Need a little help on a project, I am wanting to track the location of a object in an indoor environment. The idea is to create an automated camera system, to where I triangulate the position of the object in the room, and if the object moves the camera will stay centered on that object. I would do this with motion tracking but if other objects in the room move I do not want to track them.

My ideas so far have been some sort of IR transmitter that will not need to be triangulated, but rather picked up by a second camera and then used to position the primary camera. Or have some sort of RF signal that would need to be triangulated.

I just graduated with my BSEE, haven't taken an engineering job yet this is just something to pass the time.
 

Mr RB

Well-Known Member
Use an IR transmitter that flashes at a period of about 4 frames, using a 50:50 duty cycle or a bit less, maybe 40:50.

Then you only need one camera, it will see the IR modulation as something that is always on for 2 or 3 frames and off for 1 or 2 frames. It should be quite easy for your image processor to detect a small area of the picture that is flashing like that.
 

bobledoux

Member
It sounds like your camera will require an X and Y drive to allow it to follow the object. The camera then is mounted above and looks down.

Make an open box that looks like a '+' sign from the end. In each of the four corners place an IR sensor. Use the length of the box to limit sensor input direction. Mount an IR emitter on the object you want to follow. When the sensor box is pointed directly at the object all four sensors will read the same. Use the differential sensor measures to move about the X and Y axis.

I first saw this idea in "PIC Microcontroller Project Book," by John Iovine, copyright 2000, pages 135 and 136. John wanted to detect a light. So he placed two light sensors side-by-side with a barrier between them. The left sensor could pick up light on the left side of the barrier and the right sensor could pick up light on the right side of the sensor. By rotating the sensor assembly he could get it to point directly at the light, because at which time, both sensors read the same value.
 
Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top