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Need help with a remote monitor panel

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56eebo

New Member
Hello Everybody,,,,
I want to make a remote monitor for a UPS, the UPS has a programmable relays contacts socket. the relays are 220VAC/1A.
I just need a LEDs & Buzzers to turn ON in a specific conditions, Does anybody have a circuit that might help me???

I work in a hospital and I need this monitor very much ... please help...:eek::eek:
 

KMoffett

Well-Known Member
No answers in 30 minutes? Wow! Patients....or should I say patents. ;)

How about more info. Wiring of the programmable relays contacts socket? What you want to happen when?

The devil's in the details.

Ken
 

56eebo

New Member
Sorry man,,,
There is a programmable relays on the UPS with free contacts, for example when the UPS turn to "Battery Mode" relay no.1 will be energized and closes/open its contact. I need a remote light that indicates that the UPS in battery mode. But I don't know how to build this circuit. I want a simple circuit that I can manage it with my little knowledge ...
 
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KMoffett

Well-Known Member
Like this.....

ken

Forgot the circuit. :eek:
 

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56eebo

New Member
thanks man,
But please tell me why you put the resistance with the led (just to learn)
and please if I want another relays , how I connect them with other lights using one source??
 
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KMoffett

Well-Known Member
LEDs are "current controlled" devices. The voltage drop across them is constant...~1.7V for red ones. So, a resistor in required to limit the current to a safe value...~0.01 Amp... and drop the difference between the supply voltage, 12V, and 1.7V. (12V-1.7V)/0.01A=1030 ohms. You will see some panel mounted LED's labeled "12VDC", but they already have a resistor in the case.

ken
 
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