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NASA Apollo 11 space mission to the moon.

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
#2
Who knows?
Who cares?

But I bet they got a lot of points on their TESCO ClubCard when they filled up with petrol before they set off.

JimB
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
#3
I am sure there was someone in the control worried about that.

NASA has a lot of info in their site. Try there.
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
#5
NASA used to have specific links (IIRC, email adresses) for you to ask questions. I recall doing so twice and the answers were quite complete.
 
Thread starter #6
I did my own calculation and got---->



The amount of fuel required to decelerate the Apollo 11 Command/Service Module (CSM) and Lander (L) after reaching the moon is calculated. The kinetic energy of Apollo 11 command-service module and lander (CSML) that is propagating to the moon is calculated using the distance to the moon (363,104,000 m) and the time that the Apollo 11 space craft (CSML) propagated to the moon (4 days 6 hours and 45 minutes [364,900 seconds]),




v = (distance)/(time) = (363,104,000 m)/(364,900 s) = 983 m/s.......................................................85




The total mass of the command, service modules and lander (CSML) is,




(CM) + (SM) + (L) = 5,560 kg + 24,520 kg + 16,400 kg = 49,480 kg................................................86




Using equations 85 an 86, the kinetic energy of the Apollo 11 CSML is calculated,




1/2 mv2 = (.5)(49,480 kg)(983 m/s)2 = 2.39 x 1010 J.........................................................................87




Using the kinetic energy of the CSML (equ 87) and the energy of a kilogram of rocket fuel (4.2 x 107 J/kg), the minimum amount of fuel required to decelerate the CSML is calculated,




Fuel mass = (KE)/(fuel energy) = (2.39 x 1010 J)/(4.2 x 107 J/kg) = 569 kg...................................88




Using the rocket engine efficiency of 1% and the result of equation 88,




(569 kg)/X = .01 -------------> X = 56,900 kg......................................................................................89
 
Thread starter #7
Now that at 1% efficiency. At .1% efficiency it would be a whopping 500,000 kg and I even seen a value of .01 efficiency. See all that smoke during the space shuttle take off. Very inefficient.


From infinity and beyond your friend and Jedi knight


alright1234.
 
#10
BBC Doc.....you serious??
I tried to watch, but gave up at around t=5:30, after rolling eyes for a few mins prior to that....
Too much religious propaganda for it to be a legit BBC production.
 

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