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Marantz NR1605 clicks on then goes right back off

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StealthRT

Member
Hi all.

So I bought a Marantz NR1605 A/V off of eBay "as-is". The description reads:

Marantz NR1605 AV Receiver As Is, no returns or guarantees Shipped with USPS Parcel Select Ground. This was a new receiver purchased in approximately early 2015. The receiver still turns on but I think during a power outage/surge something happened to the HDMI in/out capabilities. The receiver is included with the adapter, manual, and remote control

They are correct - it does come on but only for a few milliseconds before turning off. I bought it thinking that it probably would just be a blown fuse or something I could see a burnt component on the board that I could replace.

Opening it up I found a total of 4 fuses. Each fuse looked just fine. Nothing blown. Examining the board(s) inside they all seem clean and shinny/new looking. Nothing on the board(s) look burnt or leaking in any way.

However, I am unable to figure out what the steps are in order to take each PCB board out in order to see what beneath it - if there are any more fuses or check for something burnt/leak.

I have taken a good amount of pictures in order to let you see what I am seeing. Perhaps you would be able to spot something that I have not. Or better yet, let me know how to go about taking the PCB boards out. I also have 2 videos showing it coming on and then off and also what it looks like on the LED screen when it comes on.

ALL Images here





 
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KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I'm not sure how to go about troubleshooting that. It might be that a self-test failed.

Power supply checks are generally first.

Look at the the power on/standby section too.
 

ramondo

Member
Sometimes thats as close as you get, YOU have to determine if the information is useful or not.
 

vtech

Active Member
I used to be involved in Consumer Electronics for many years...
This unit is a FPGA based design , NOT service friendly and rather complicated for an average person not involved in the servicing field. It requires a special set of jigs to be able to run the unit outside it's case which makes it even more difficult to repair.
While it may in fact be a power supply or connection issue, the part about the "power surge/outing" can do a number of things to the point of simply making it uneconomical to repair? Hard to tell...
Based on your observation, since a least it seems to be powering up momentarily, the FIRST to check is to attempt the DIAGNOSTIC MODE(thru the front panel). Can you even go in to diagnostic mode?

(Starting from Page 19 of the Service man. attached)

Good Luck

WAIT A SEC!!! there is shipping damage shown on your video, the back panel is busted--perhaps this is secondary to the original problem? but it can certainly prevent it from powering up.
Damaged.jpg
 

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Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I used to be involved in Consumer Electronics for many years...
This unit is a FPGA based design , NOT service friendly and rather complicated for an average person not involved in the servicing field. It requires a special set of jigs to be able to run the unit outside it's case which makes it even more difficult to repair.

I don't really see why using an FPGA would make it any more difficult to repair? - the main issue is they are so impossible to work on, and as you rightly pointed out you couldn't do so without a set of VERY expensive jigs and extension leads. I always avoided AV amps like the plague!.

Good spot on the smashed PCB though!.
 

vtech

Active Member
I don't really see why using an FPGA would make it any more difficult to repair?....
Perhaps I was not clear regarding added difficulty;
What does a FPGA require?
1. Familiarity to connect & use the programming hardware/software without completely bricking the unit. ( Older Altera in this case which is pretty much obsolete since Intel takeover)
2. Custom software files that are nearly impossible to find.---unlike the old days of ROM.

And thanks, , regarding the damage, I've had a keen eye for it any time the word "shipping" is mentioned.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Perhaps I was not clear regarding added difficulty;
What does a FPGA require?
1. Familiarity to connect & use the programming hardware/software without completely bricking the unit. ( Older Altera in this case which is pretty much obsolete since Intel takeover)
2. Custom software files that are nearly impossible to find.---unlike the old days of ROM.

So not a 'difficulty' at all - if it's faulty (which is EXTREMELY unlikely) you get a replacement from the manufacturer. The capability of programing an FPGA (or micro) has nothing whatsoever to do with servicing or repairs - it's like complaining you can't make your own replacement integrated circuits (which is no dafter, as my son-in-law actually has the capability of doing so).
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
actually it's not a FPGA but there are two control processors (main processor and subprocessor) the processors are very rarely the problem. i worked on these a lot (and they are identical to many DENON receivers, with the only difference being the front panel exterior). if you have a broken front panel board, it's possible the two processors can't talk to each other. there are other things however that can cause immediate shutdown, but you probably can't do the diagnostic readout on the display if the display board is broken.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
actually it's not a FPGA but there are two control processors (main processor and subprocessor) the processors are very rarely the problem. i worked on these a lot (and they are identical to many DENON receivers, with the only difference being the front panel exterior). if you have a broken front panel board, it's possible the two processors can't talk to each other. there are other things however that can cause immediate shutdown, but you probably can't do the diagnostic readout on the display if the display board is broken.

Makes no difference if FPGA or micro, you HAVE to buy ready programmed replacements from the manufacturer - but as I've already said, it's EXTREMELY unlikely for one to fail.
 
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