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Li-Ion Battery datasheet

Pommie

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#7
It's a 9V 600mAh battery, Max discharge rate is 1C which is 600mA and it will last one hour at 600mA. At half that (300mA) it will last 2 hours.

Mike.
 

dknguyen

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Most Helpful Member
#9
It's a lithium-ion version of a regular 9V battery. That means it should run for much longer but has lower voltage (won't actually be 9V but instead it will be around 7.4V).

Discharge voltage cutoff in the datasheet is the voltage when the battery is considered to be dead. It will have this voltage when dead but provide practically no current, so you can get no power from it. Batteries don't drop to 0V when they are dead. It's not like a gas tank.

Charge cut-off voltage is the voltage when the battery is full. It will drop fairly rapidly once you drain it a bit and stay at around 7.4V for most of the battery's remaining charge before taking a nosedive again just before it dies.


Note that not all battery chemistries behave this way where they stay for the same voltage most of the time; Some have a continuously decreasing voltage as they are drained.
 
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Thread starter #10
correct me if I am wrong. So to charge the 9v battery I need constant voltage or current which 8.4v and 0.2c? and when the battery is drained it will show 5.5v and it will not produce current?

Thank you for all of your efforts. I really appreciated it :)
 
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dknguyen

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#11
Those lines just in the datasheet just briefly describe the test used to determine those numbers. There's devils in the details. Don't actually use simple rules like that for charging since lithium batteries explode in flames when mischarged. Use a proper charger for them. The faster you charge, the more dangerous it can be.

Yes, when the battery is drained it will show 5.5V and produce no current. However, if it actually drops that low the battery will be over-discharged and be damaged. In the case of lithium batteries that means they are not safe to charge up again. You should go no lower than 3V [per cell], and even that might be too low. You never actually want to drain any type of battery to 0% since that damages them. You don't want to go below 20% for lithium batteries anyways since the voltage drops so steeply after that you won't be properly powering your device anyways.
 
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#14
Its different for different batteries, but don't forget the written in the datasheet "rest for 2 hours" and etc. The current is different depending on the voltage at the moment. Also don't discharge the battery to more than 50% if you want its life(charge/discharge cycles) to be longer.
 

audioguru

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#16
Isn't it illegal to manufacture and sell a rechargeable Lithium battery that is the same size and same connections but different voltage as a Ni-MH battery? That is why there are no lithium rechargeable AAA and AA size batteries.
Tenergy batteries for RC airplanes are cheap Chinese ones sold only by HobbyKing. I did not know that the Chinese factory has an office in California.

Some of these 9V Lithium rechargeable batteries have a "protection" circuit board that limits charge and discharge voltage and current but others don't. But the specification says they all must be tested the same which is completely WRONG!
 

dknguyen

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Most Helpful Member
#17
Isn't it illegal to manufacture and sell a rechargeable Lithium battery that is the same size and same connections but different voltage as a Ni-MH battery? That is why there are no lithium rechargeable AAA and AA size batteries.
Tenergy batteries for RC airplanes are cheap Chinese ones sold only by HobbyKing. I did not know that the Chinese factory has an office in California.

Some of these 9V Lithium rechargeable batteries have a "protection" circuit board that limits charge and discharge voltage and current but others don't. But the specification says they all must be tested the same which is completely WRONG!
I do not know, but maybe the law, if it exists, is rooted in a compatibility requirement. AAA and AA batteries are single-cell and normally 1.2-1.5V, but you can never get that for lithium, even if you only use a single cell, since a single cell is always 3V or higher. That difference is large that it won't work interchangeably in any device. So for AA and AAA, that makes sense.

But for a 9V battery which is made of multiple cells anyways, the numbers work out differently. A NiMh, NiCd, or Alkaline is six 1.5V cells or seven 1.2V cells, you can stack two lithium cells and get 7.4V which is close enough to operate most devices properly.
 
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Nigel Goodwin

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#19

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#20
Banggood is Chinese and does not care if the Meco LiIon batteries from India are illegal and dangerous to be the same size as ordinary AA cells.
Can anybody imagine the explosion that would occur if somebody accidently put one or two cells in a fan or other motorized product designed for ordinary AA cells?
 

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