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Jumper wires on mass-produced boards

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Thread starter #1
Does anyone know of a 3-4" jumper component that can be placed with automation? I have a 4-layer board here that we need to get 50+ made and there is a signal that just can't be routed with shorter jumpers or otherwise. It just has to travel too far and is surrounded at it's origin such that planes are of no use. The only other way is adding another layer to the board but that seems silly for a single signal.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#2
Years ago there were automation machines that placed jumpers. I think these machines have been "recycled".

Surface mount or through hole?
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#6
I would make two large SMT pads and hand solder a jumper wire.
OR
I would make two holes and hand solder a jumper wire.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#8
Years ago we made boards with only a ground and power layers. (pads and holes) All the signal traces were "transformer wire" (paint insulation).
There was a machine that welded the wires to the pad, then ran the wire across the board to the next pad and welded then cut the wire. At the end the board was covered with clear paint to hold the wires in place. (no parts on the board while welding)
It was something like wire wrap. No sockets.
Sorry I can't remember what it was called. Have not seen it for 40 years. Well this is not helping you.
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Thread starter #9
Years ago we made boards with only a ground and power layers. (pads and holes) All the signal traces were "transformer wire" (paint insulation).
There was a machine that welded the wires to the pad, then ran the wire across the board to the next pad and welded then cut the wire. At the end the board was covered with clear paint to hold the wires in place. (no parts on the board while welding)
It was something like wire wrap. No sockets.
Sorry I can't remember what it was called. Have not seen it for 40 years. Well this is not helping you.
I need that machine.
 

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