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I need some help

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ODIN'S DEN

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I have a half wave power supply that 120v, 60hz transformer with a 36v sencondary winding. i also have a silicon diode that transform the secondary ac into pulsating dc. what would be the peak voltage of the dc pulses across the load:?: thkx[/b]
 

williB

New Member
it really depends on the load ..
if the load is purely resistive ,and is a high resistance , then the Vpeak will be around 36V..
 

Pommie

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If your transformer is 36V RMS, then the peak voltage will be 36* Sqrt(2) = 36*1.414 = 51V

This will be with no load. As you increase the load then the voltage will drop.

Mike.
 

audioguru

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If your transformer is 36V RMS when fully loaded, its voltage will rise with no load maybe to 39V. Therefore the peak is root 2, times 39V = 55.1V minus about 0.7V for the diode. Maybe in down under, transformer output voltages don't increase when not fully loaded. :lol:
 

Pommie

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audioguru said:
If your transformer is 36V RMS when fully loaded, its voltage will rise with no load maybe to 39V. Therefore the peak is root 2, times 39V = 55.1V minus about 0.7V for the diode. Maybe in down under, transformer output voltages don't increase when not fully loaded. :lol:
I stand corrected, the 36V will be when loaded. I blame it on this cold winter weather were getting down here making my brain work slower. It's midnight here and the outside temperature has plummeted to 14C :shock:

Mike.
 

Pyroandrew

New Member
14 degrees, we hardly even get that over here. It rains and is always cold, a lot colder than 14. :lol: If it never when below 14 here I would not mind so much about the gov wrecking our country.
 

williB

New Member
last winter here was very long
it wasnt the most severe , but seemed like it would never stop..
it is spring now and yesterday was a beautiful 70 F 8)
but today is overcast and cooler.. :lol:
hehe just sayin..
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Andrew,

I know. I moved from Manchester 18 months ago so I know all about rain and cold. It's currently Autumn here and so daytime only gets to mid 20's :p

Mike.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
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Willi,

70F = (70-32)*5/9 = 21C. Very nice temp for spring time. Which part of the states are you in?

Mike.
 

williB

New Member
east coast , about a mile to the atlantic ocean..
around 1.7Km for all you on the ' other ' system.. :p
 

ODIN'S DEN

New Member
????

Pommie said:
If your transformer is 36V RMS, then the peak voltage will be 36* Sqrt(2) = 36*1.414 = 51V

This will be with no load. As you increase the load then the voltage will drop.

Mike.

SO the load across R(load) will be 51v what about the hafl wave, does it play a part in the load?
 
Re: ????

ODIN'S DEN said:
SO the load across R(load) will be 51v
The peak voltage across R(load) will be 51.

what about the hafl wave, does it play a part in the load?
I don't understand your question.
 

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