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I m eed a cheep battery pack that will run a heater with Dollar store batteries. Can anyone help?.

DrG

Active Member
I hooked up 14-9v batteries to add voltages but no luck.
I understand it is your first post - welcome to the board, etc...

How could any human being address your problem with the information you have provided? Maybe there are some, and maybe they are here, but I am not one of them.

You hooked up 14, 9V batteries to get 126V and connected it to what - a 120VAC heater?

Let's start over. What are the requirements of the heater? Voltage and current? That information is probably listed right there on the heater.
 

DrG

Active Member
I think that you have an AC heater.

It is not surprising that your battery scheme did not work. Even if the heater were DC, they would not last long.

It is a bit alarming that you would try something like 14 X 9V batteries and think it would work. I don't think you should be messing around with this stuff until you learn more about some of the fundamentals so that you can address such issues safely..
 

Nathanc1912

New Member
Thank you for yout input. I am not sure where to go from here, but Sunday was very cold where I am and i want to provide heat. If it were you, where would you start?
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
To put it another way, the 9V batteries (no matter how many you connect in series) will be able to provide probably tenth of an amp, for a very few hours.

A mains powered electric heater needs nine amps per thousand watts rating, on US 115V power.
The battery voltage would just collapse under the massive overload.

You would need chain of car-battery sized batteries to get even a few hours use from one.

That's why people use propane-powered heaters; a propane cylinder has more energy capacity than a stack of batteries many, many times larger.

(And a heater and gas cylinder would cost less that the batteries needed to actually run an electric heater).
 

DrG

Active Member
Thank you for yout input. I am not sure where to go from here, but Sunday was very cold where I am and i want to provide heat. If it were you, where would you start?
I don't know if you are putting me on or not, so I will answer honestly. I would start at social services and I would ask for help.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
For Christmas I was given a vest to wear outside that has a heating pad in its back. It is powered by a 5V power bank (portable phone charger).
It is rated at 8W and has three heat settings: 40 degrees C, 45 degrees C or 50 degrees C. My 10Ah power bank can power it for 4.2 to 8.4 hours.
 

Mickster

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Not putting you on. I want to provide heat on a bus when the bus heaters are just not enough.
Who is the heat to be provided for?
Just yourself/someone else, or all other passengers as well?
The reason I'm asking is due to this:
Will pass your idea along. Thanks for your time.
If only for yourself/someone else, the socks/gloves suggested by DrG, as well as the vest suggested by audioguru, could likely work well.
However, if you're looking to supplement the heating on the whole bus, for all the passengers, something else is probably required.
Please clarify.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
9V batteries at The Dollar Store are cheap "Super Heavy Duty" (old carbon-zinc type) which produce almost no current and only for a short time.
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Keep in mind making heat with electricity takes quite a bit of power. You may want to note the power rating on the heater you mentioned. Typical home electric small space heaters can draw 1,000 watts easily or more. That's 1,000 watts / 120 volts = 8.33 amps so good luck with small batteries. I would consider as Audio Guru suggest such as heated clothing or winter electric clothing as worn by motorcyclist. You will still be dragging around a battery either way.

Ron
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
From the entertaininghacks website:

"A good answer is more likely to come from a good question; a bad question is more likely to be ignored or to result in irrelevant answers."
"Say what you know and don’t know. It encourages us to answer, and it demonstrates respect by avoiding wasting everybody’s time"
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
From the entertaininghacks website:

"A good answer is more likely to come from a good question; a bad question is more likely to be ignored or to result in irrelevant answers."
"Say what you know and don’t know. It encourages us to answer, and it demonstrates respect by avoiding wasting everybody’s time"
My personal experience also say that, usually, by when you know what to ask and how to ask it, you do not need to ask anymore.;)
 

DrG

Active Member
It can be frustrating to respond to a thread, with good intentions, but a sinking feeling that it is going to be 10 posts or more before you figure out what the TS did that does not work or what the TS wants to do.

I guess I was a little snarky in my first response, but after a few posts, I thought; here is someone who is cold and has no electricity. Although it is not clear exactly what the situation was, it appears to have been: here is someone who notices that he and others on the bus are cold and would like to provide heat to everyone, or to a few particular people, when the bus' heater is insufficient.

I submit that nobody could tell that from the first post. The title simply said that he wanted to run a heater from cheap batteries.

It reminds me of this thread, not because they are similar posts per se, but because the question of asking "why" the TS wants to do something came up. IOW maybe one of the first questions should have been, "why do you want to run the heater" with 14, 9V batteries? - something like that.

As it turned out, eventually, we seemed to understand what was going on (although not completely) and I, and others, made the suggestion of battery-operated warmers (gloves, socks, vests) were an alternative. Of course, if the original problem was, as noted, "How do you provide heat for an entire bus load of people when it is not your bus?" My answer would have been, you don't because it is problematic for a number of reasons.

One question is whether or not the TS would ask another question and, if so, would they include more information in the initial post. Alternatively, would they be less willing to ask a question. I hope it is the former.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It reminds me of this thread,
That thread was completely different. It was about Cupboards and Sand and Locks and possibly Drugs and using the word "Nefarious" and a bunch of posts were quoted by moderators before they deleted the original then additional posts were made until the mods came back to delete the quoted phrases that were from deleted posts and the OP hung around the whole while and even made the last post to the crazy thread. This thread doesn't have any of that... yet.
 

Ian Rogers

User Extraordinaire
Forum Supporter
Most Helpful Member
Bickerring gets us nowhere, certainly doesn't help the OP...

He needs a better understanding of voltage and current and why 126Vdc with 800mA cannot power a 120Vac at 1KW..

BUT!! As his doubts have already been answered it makes no sense to carry on.
 

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