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Howto connect two speakers in parallel

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manchomancho

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How to connect two speakers in parallel

using a capacitor without reducing the sound and which capacitor should be connected to different capacity of speaker.
 

Nigel Goodwin

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How to connect two speakers in parallel

using a capacitor without reducing the sound and which capacitor should be connected to different capacity of speaker.
You don't need a capacitor to connect two speakers in parallel, please explain EXACTLY what you're wanting to do.

If it's make a crossover for a woofer and tweeter, it's dependent on a great many things.
 

audioguru

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Two same speakers in parallel draw double the current of one speaker and might blow up the amplifier.
 

audioguru

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I think that speakers in series have poor damping of their resonances from the amplifier.
Some guitar speakers are in series for the boomy effect of poor damping and their vacuum tube amplifier provides poor damping anyway.
 

tblo163

New Member
audioguru is right,(as usual,that's why I dedicated a video to him on youtube) It's important to match your speaker impedance to your set,if you have a speaker impedance of say,8 ohms & the set is rated at 4 ohms,the speaker will lose some of it's efficiency.However,if the impedance were mismatched the other around,then not only will efficiency suffer,but there is the possibility of damaging the unit.eg;two 4 ohm speakers in parallel will result in 2 ohms impedance,whereas two 4 ohm speakers in series results in 8 ohms impedance.If the terminals of the speakers are not marked +&-,you can check them with a 1.5 v battery.If the "cone" moves inwards,then you have found the right polarity,if it moves outwards,then it's wrong.
 

audioguru

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I never saw the video you dedicated to me. Where is it?

A modern "set" (audio amplifier) has an output impedance as low as possible, about 0.04 ohms or less. Its minimum load impedance depends on its current rating.

Antique vacuum tube (valves) amplifiers had a fairly high output impedance that was equal to the load impedance and had hardly any damping of the resonances of speakers so they sounded boomy and shrieky.

Ohm's Law shows that a higher impedance load draws less power from an amplifier.
 

tblo163

New Member
The video was created using my mobile phone camera,the picture & sound quallity are not very good,but now I've got my new cam-corder,any future videos should be ok. you
can find it on youtube, search terryblount163 you should see a list of about 24 videos,
the one you want is titled audioguru,you might find the others interesting too.if you have any problems let me know and I'll find the URL.(you might find it by searching "audioguru"
 

audioguru

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Hi Terry,
I found the video you dedicated to me.
The picture is so fuzzy and your accent is so strong that it hurts. I turned it off after about 1 minute.
 

DTaylor

New Member
Two same speakers in parallel draw double the current of one speaker and might blow up the amplifier.
In a low impedance audio system you would ordinarily specify a combination of speakers based within the limits of the power of the amplifier and if using 2 speakers in parallel on say a 4Ohm amp you would use 8Ohm speakers bringing the line impedance down to 4Ohm and you would have the maximum power possibly available. For more speakers a serial/parallel arrangement would be required to achieve the desired line impedance. You can check this with either a moving coil impedance meter or a digital Watt meter.

In addition your audio source can be supplied via a mixer or a compressor which will allow you to fine tune your signal or limit the I/P to the amp, eliminating any risk of distortion and over driving of the amp.

In all the years Ive been working on this type of equipment in clubs/bars and cars the only time Ive ever seen a cap used is in large woofer systems in vehicles. The cap values here are upto 1F which is large and they are connected delivering power TO the amp when the large inductive load ie the speakers demand more than the car electrical system will allow.

I dont think it is necessary to install a cap accross your speaker terminals as it may cause detrimetal effects to the cross over inside to speaker as that is expecting a clean signal from the O/P of the amp on low impedance. You may find that the smoothing effect of the cap prior to the speaker will leave the crossover confused about where to send the LF and HF as they will be less defined.

Id be keen to know what happens either way.
 

tblo163

New Member
been there .done that

Sorry about that,I'm working on improving it! With regards to my accent-I moved from Quebec about 40 years ago,and then lived in the Prinzbach (Swartzwald)until 1974,so my English is a mixture of Canadian,German & Nottingham Slang-SORRY (I can't improve that) Guten tag Terry.
 
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