Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

how to connect picKit2 to a TQFP pic24

Status
Not open for further replies.

ced

New Member
Hi,
I am interested in programming a TQFP pic24 with a picKit2, a pic24FJ128GB106 .
I don't know how to connect the picKit2 to this pic as it is going to be difficult to plug the pic24 into a breadboard .
Is there some way to program the pic24 else than buying an expensive development board ?
Thanks,
Cédric
 

mvs sarma

Well-Known Member
Hi,
I am interested in programming a TQFP pic24 with a picKit2, a pic24FJ128GB106 .
I don't know how to connect the picKit2 to this pic as it is going to be difficult to plug the pic24 into a breadboard .
Is there some way to program the pic24 else than buying an expensive development board ?
Thanks,
Cédric
perhaps, you can develop an ICSP pin connector exactly to match the PICKIT2 connector.
The restraint is RB6, RB7 and PGM pin ( generally RB5-but chip dependent) need to have cut points, generally they provide solder bridge locations. This helps isolating the loads on these pins during programming. They can be normalized immediately after programming. debugging aspect, I am yet to study and indicate. As far possible prevent using these pins in real design so that they can be left for programing purposes.

Once your chip is on your target board, you can connect the ICSP, program your pickit2 as if the chip is externally powered.
Most important point to be noted is the 3.3V working interface. Microchip has given methods as to how to implement this.
 

blueroomelectronics

Well-Known Member
You'll need an adapter PCB to bring the pins out to a 0.1" spacing. The 64pin TQFP will not be solderless breadboard compatible though. Can you use a smaller 24 series PIC in a DIP package?
www.dipmicro.com carries some SOIC adapters.
 
Last edited:

mvs sarma

Well-Known Member
You'll need an adapter PCB to bring the pins out to a 0.1" spacing. The 64pin TQFP will not be solderless breadboard compatible though. Can you use a smaller 24 series PIC in a DIP package?
www.dipmicro.com carries some SOIC adapters.
Mike, can't the chip be programmed from the user's Target board?
Microchip indicates that, the PIC24 series can be debugged using the ICSP connector itself.
 
Last edited:

ced

New Member
Thanks for your help.
Actually after having looked a little bit around, I think that's not possible to use TQFP
without soldering the chip .
Either I use ICSP or else I'll have to do my own adapter if I still want to use a breadboard :) ...
One day I'll have to forget breadboard .
 
Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top