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Gatwick drone problem. Solutions?

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Pommie

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It appears that in the UK, any drone sold has to have restricted airspace built in and it won't fly there. Someone either built their own or reprogrammed their drone to be able to invade the airspace. How can this be stopped? We're going to get copycats around the world. If we block the signals then we could still get autonomous drones still a problem.
How do we stop this? Is it guys with shotguns around the perimeter? An electronic solution? Any ideas?

Mike.
 

sagor1

Active Member
Vendors should have to supply "kill codes" into every drone (burned into firmware), and let the authorities have the code. They can then drop any drone within a certain distance (line of sight).
Shotguns have a limited range, line of sight RF signals can carry a lot farther. Jamming may not work, as it may simply force the drone to keep flying in its current mode.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
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There are open source flight controllers and you can buy the motors and props etc. from anywhere. I can build a drone from scratch. Regulation is not going to work. Whoever caused the problems at Gatwick didn't follow regulations and a kill code would not have worked.

Mike.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
It appears that in the UK, any drone sold has to have restricted airspace built in and it won't fly there.
Not as far as I know, all that I'm aware of is a law been passed this last summer making it illegal to fly a drone near an airport.

Incidentally, they arrested two people last night in connection with the offence - presumably they will be getting substantial prison sentences?, depending on what they eventually get charged with. Possible charges are treason or attempted murder, plus the airlines etc. will be suing them for millions of damages.
 

crutschow

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How about a high power laser to zap it.
 

unclejed613

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i've been thinking of building a drone that drops a net on another drone, or drops a bunch of Kevlar string on another drone, which tangles up in the propellers. what brings this to mind is i have a lifetime supply of Kevlar string, and i'm often thinking of things it would be useful for.
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
Welcome to the brave new world of Technology Terror Threats. T3, for the acronym lovers.

Like every threat ever devised, someone will come up with a countermeasure, or AT3.

I ignore what it will be, but I am sure that as I write this, many bright minds are already thinking about it.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
i've been thinking of building a drone that drops a net on another drone, or drops a bunch of Kevlar string on another drone, which tangles up in the propellers. what brings this to mind is i have a lifetime supply of Kevlar string, and i'm often thinking of things it would be useful for.
My daughter made kevlar string during her Chemistry degree, she uses a length of it as a necklace with some kind of metal jewellery (I think it's a molecule of something?) - anyway, as you're obviously aware it's unbelievably strong.

As for your idea I watched a video on YouTube a few years ago, which showed how to make an 'anti-drone cannon' - basically it launched four projectiles with a net slung between them using compressed air. I don't think there's any need for kevlar, any sort of string net would mess up and tangle in the propellers.

However, when I was watching the news coverage of the Gatwick incident I remembered the project, but from what little video there was the drone looked to be pretty damn high, probably too high for such measures? - perhaps a shotgun might be better :D

I mentioned above that the Police had arrested two people, but after a few days they were released without charge - although some newspapers did print their names.
 

unclejed613

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anyway, as you're obviously aware it's unbelievably strong.
yes, the largest diameter i have is 3mm, and it can be used to tow a car. kevlar can also cut things in the same way piano wire can. i had to re-learn how to tie knots, because kevlar can cut itself if certain knots are used.

This one was really disappointing - it looks really cool, I was expecting it to launch something exciting, and it did no such thing.
looks like a tool made for government agencies. the FCC frowns on people making and selling jammers. i found this warning on the droneshield website:

*DroneCannon not been authorized as required by the United States Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”). This device is not, and may not be, offered for sale or lease, or sold or leased, in the United States, other than to the United States government, its agencies, and its properly delegated representatives, until such authorization is obtained. The use of DroneCannon in the United States by other persons or entities, including, in certain circumstances, state or local government agencies, is prohibited by federal law. Laws limiting the availability of DroneCannon to certain types of users may apply in other jurisdictions, and any sales will be conducted only in compliance with the applicable laws.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Welcome to the brave new world of Technology Terror Threats. T3, for the acronym lovers.
reminds me of the Clint Eastwood movie, with a car chase, but one of the cars was an R/C model...
 
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