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Fixing a Siemens Induction Hob

mjeshurun

New Member
Hello Friends,

I'm new to the forum and rather a noob in relation to electronics math.

I own a Siemens Induction Hob model number: EX675JYW1E/01, which recently raised plastic smelling smoke while I used it.
After opening the device's enclosure with an electrician, we found that one capacitor on a PC board was faulty and caused the smoke and problem.

IMG_2404.JPG


The electrician said his company can replace the whole PC board with a new one, but in my view, replacing the whole PC board instead of just replacing the faulty capacitor is not environmentally friendly and will just cost more.

As such, I would like to order a replacement capacitor and solder it myself instead of the faulty one.
My problem is I could not find an online store that sells a capacitor model that exactly matches the capacitor on my hob.

My capacitor indicates the following info on it: R.46 MKP X2 SH 2.7 uF M 275Vac 40/110/56 B C L3 QA12004 (please see earlier photo).

I found on the internet a 2.2uf and a 3.0uf capacitors, but not 2.7uf.
Will using a 2.2uf or 3.0uf capacitor cause a problem?

Can anyone suggest where I can order a matching 2.7uf capacitor?

Thank you very much for your help
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The value may be important for resonance with the inductor?

Places such as Farnell have a good selection; you need to look at types that have the same lead spacing as yours.
It can be higher voltage rated, but not lower.


Once you find a suitable part, you can search the makers part number to find it from other places, if you cannot order from Farnell (or Newark, in the US).
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
the cap is a hash filter, to keep noise from the power supply from leaking into the power line, and the capacitance value is not critical (so, 2.2uF should be fine), but the voltage rating and the "X2" rating is critical. the "X2" rating is a code for the spike voltage the cap can survive. X2 is 2500V, X1 is 4000V, Y1 is 8000V, and Y2 is 5000V. most likely the cap damage was caused by a line spike. replacing it with an X1 rated cap will most likely prevent a future failure of the same type.
 

mjeshurun

New Member
the cap is a hash filter, to keep noise from the power supply from leaking into the power line, and the capacitance value is not critical (so, 2.2uF should be fine), but the voltage rating and the "X2" rating is critical. the "X2" rating is a code for the spike voltage the cap can survive. X2 is 2500V, X1 is 4000V, Y1 is 8000V, and Y2 is 5000V. most likely the cap damage was caused by a line spike. replacing it with an X1 rated cap will most likely prevent a future failure of the same type.
Thank you, unclejed613 .
This helps
 

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