Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

EMF detector for microwave/laptop?

Status
Not open for further replies.

dave3162

New Member
Hi guys,

I want to make EMF Detector - Aaron ALAI

But I don't have the specialist blue board shown. I do have lots of wires, resistors, transistors, capacitors, battery pack, LEDs and a speaker.

Is it possible to make this with what I have to test my laptop?
 
Last edited:

reidinstruments

New Member
Hello, If you just want to try a simple emf/gauss meter, you can build one with about three parts. A DC volt meter, a hall effect sensor, and a battery. It seems that this is all this circuit does, but he gives you the code for the chip so it can be displayed on a lcd display. The dc volt meter will display a value that is equal to the gauss and then you can do the simple math. If you want to do with a microprocessor try the simple PICAXE. You can look picaxe up on the web and the software to program it is free plus the chip you would need would cost around 3 bucks from sparkfun electronics. you can go to jameco or digikey for the hall effect sensor and sparkfun electronics for the picaxe setup. Hope this helps. For a scematic on a hall efect sensor, almost always in the data sheets for sensors they show you an example of how to hook it up. Hope this helps :)
 

dave3162

New Member
I thought he was just using the loose wire as input? Maybe measuring the EM induced in them as per physics 101?

I literally only have available the cheap parts above. No opportunity to get a hold of a DC voltmeter, or hall effect sensor. Do have a battery though!

My goal was to use the LED (brighter = more emf) or speaker as output (louder = more emf detected?) and the loose wire as input.

Is it even possible?
 

dave3162

New Member
But the guy in the video made it! So it must be possible. He's just using a wire and resistors and that special board. If I could make the important part of that special board with my parts, it should be possible...

else, could you please explain how his thing works? Is he measuring the current induced in the "loose wire" that hes waving about?
 

reidinstruments

New Member
Hello again, sorry I was thinking you wanted to get a actual gauss read out :) Yes what he is doing is very very simple. His numbers on the displpay mean nothing other than what you would calibrate them to but these devices are used every day by electricians for non contact voltage detection of AC. Everything electronic puts emf and he is showinf this in form of AC voltage detection as far as I can tell from the video. Here is a simple schematic for you to try. good luck :)


here is a link to the parts and schematic I found

**broken link removed**

71915-1.aspx
 

dave3162

New Member
Hi yes! That looks like exactly what I need. Some questions please!:

1. What is A1, A2 and C1 in that diagram. What is C1,ceramic plate for? I understand R is the resistors and of course the battery and antenna seem easy enough.
2. How can I output to the speaker or LED? Is this difficult to do?
3. Is it possible to make this simpler? Like just wires and resistors and LED and battery?
 

reidinstruments

New Member
Hi again, A1 and A2 are op amps to boost the signal. They both are enclosed in the IC that's is on the schematics parts list on the link i posted. Hope this helps :)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top