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Electronic Dice

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Electric Rain

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This will be a very cool thing to have. :D I need schematics for "Electronic Dice." The components that will be visible outside of the box, (I like to have my projects enclosed. :) ) will be two 7-segment LED displays, an SPDT slide switch, and a momentary pushbutton. The pushbutton will be the trigger for the random number. The seven segment led displays will display the number. And here's the big thing, the slide switch, will determine if the led displays will show a random number between 1-6 or 2-12. I am very excited about this, so can someone help please? :D Thank you very much. You have no idea how much this means to me. I LOVE THESE FOURMS!!! :D :D :D
 

Jimbo

New Member
Doctronics has a schematic with 7segment display:
http://www.doctronics.co.uk/4510.htm#electronic die

Of course, this is also only for one dice.

There is a "problem" if you expand the schematic to simulate two dices though. The random number will really be random between 2 and 12 (or 'between 0 and 10 and shifted left by ignoring the LSB for ease of construction' :) ). With real dices however, the chances are not equally spread. For example, throwing a '7' can be done in 6 out of 36 possible ways (1-6, 2-5, 3-4, 4-3, 5-2, 6-1), while throwing snake eyes will only happen once every 36 times. Well theoretically anyway.

Of course, the question is if you really want to simulate the real world. I'd definately NOT do it if I were the bank in a game of Craps :D.
 

Electric Rain

New Member
I am working on this with the info you guys have given me so far. Everything but the switch to select between 1-6 and 2-12 is figured out right...? I can't figure this out. Hey! I got it! Is there a way I could build two dice... and when the switch is in one position, it only takes the output from ONE, a displays it. But if it's in the other position, it will combine the outputs of both electronic dice with some kind of chip.............................. I don't know. Can someone help me figure out how to combine the outputs? Or something? :cry: I don't get it. :? Maybe AND gates? How do those work?
 

Electric Rain

New Member
Alright...

Sebi, I think I might do that, it looks pretty cool how it makes it look like real dice. Matrix dice I think they call that right? Anyway, I could just have the switch be a SPST. Instead of SPDT. The SPST could simply switch the power off for the 2nd dice. However, I think I'd rather do the 7-segment thing... I think

Jimbo, about the random thing... here's the way I see it. I think, that all games would be fairer, if the dice were always completely random about there numbers. Don't you feel the same way? Anyway, needless to say I think that's ok. So, how could I expand it into 2 dice? By the way, thanks for finding a 7-segment one. :wink:

themikestar: Looks good, also, thanks for the 7-segment version. But I might have a hard time adding a second digit.

nettron1000: Like I said to Sebi, matrix dice are cool. If I decide to do the 7-segment thing, how could I do that? Hmm... maybe I'll do both! :D

Everyone: I think the main problem, is the 7-segment adding. You see... if I used matrix dice, then they could be two totally different circuits altogether. So I would only need a one dice version. But, how stupid would it be, to do the same thing with 7-sement displays, if you have to add the two digits together anyway? I mean, the point of digital displays, is so it will give you a direct reading, as if it were on paper. Now, doing the matrix dice version would be easier, but it's not digital. (Isn't that always the case? The digital version is harder to make and more expensive...but better, than the analog version.) So, ALL I need, is schematics for a random number from 2-12 to show up on two digital displays. Then, I'll just use an SPDT switch, to either power the one digit version, or the two digit version. Or, I can do the matrix thing, and that's already figured out. Now, one more question. Can I use the same 7-segment display, for the one digit digital version, and the first digit of the 2 digit version? Or will the IC's damage each other depending on which version (1 or 2 digit) is powered? If you have gotten this far in reading, and are still actually paying attention to what you’re reading, thank you very much. Now this thing is almost finished! I just need the 2-12 digit schematics. Then I'll be able to stop bugging you guys about this. :D Once again, thanks everyone. :wink:
 

nettron1000

New Member
I think you mean something like this....



Its a partial block diagram i just quickly slapped together but it should get you started.
 

Electric Rain

New Member
...No way... so, this picks a random number between 2-12? (You know, I say "Between" 2-12, but 2&12 are included. :lol: ) Thank you so much!!! I do believe that everything is figured out now! (Well, I'm new to this stuff, so I don't know the pin numbering of the ICs or what they are and the value of the resistor and stuff like that.) Thank you everyone! I don't really know what else to say. Out of the 100000 threads I've started, I think this may be the only one that has completely answered all of my questions. So, I guess that's all. I just need to get the money to buy the parts, and... build it... Once again, thank you everyone. :wink:

Edit: Wait... the "7410" is a Triple 3 Input NAND Gate, the "556" is a 556 Timer closely related to the 555 Timer, the "7490" is a Decade counter and the "7448" is a BCD to 7-segment decoder/common-cathode LED driver with ripple blank input. Right? :lol: Well, if that's right... then all I need to know is the pin numbering of the ICs, the value of the resistor, and the voltage. Is it 9V? I hope it is. Thanks in advance. :D
 

nettron1000

New Member
Edit: Wait... the "7410" is a Triple 3 Input NAND Gate, the "556" is a 556 Timer closely related to the 555 Timer, the "7490" is a Decade counter and the "7448" is a BCD to 7-segment decoder/common-cathode LED driver with ripple blank input. Right? Well, if that's right... then all I need to know is the pin numbering of the ICs, the value of the resistor, and the voltage. Is it 9V? I hope it is. Thanks in advance.
Yes you have it prettywell all down pat, the 556 is a dual timer, it has two 555 timers on one IC. You can easily find the pin out id for all the ICs by a simple search with Google or we can help you find what you need.

Finding the resistor values for the timer is quite easy, heres a link that explains how to do that:

http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/gadgets/555/555.html

You can use just about any power supply voltage within the voltage range of the ICs, a 9 volt battery or a 6 volt battery pack would be fine.

Im assumming you have a breadboard ( also called a prototyping board) ? you need this to test your circuit to be sure that it works before actually soldering it up on a PC board. I have 4 such boards and they're full of components of various circuits im working on, and its all just for one project !
 

mechie

New Member
Random Number Generator

Hold on guys...
nettron1000 suggests a circuit which is simply two 0 to 6 number generators unless I have missed something ?
So it will happily show 00 or 66 ?

If you create a circuit that can show 2 to 12 (or more) and use a switch to select at what values it resets then the result would be ...
a) 7-seg display
b) 2 to 12 or 1 to 6

The counter would probably be simple, requiring just a few gates to implement the reset logic.

No, I don't have a circuit - yet !
 

nettron1000

New Member
so, this picks a random number between 2-12? (You know, I say "Between" 2-12, but 2&12 are included. )
The above circuit will generate any random (or psuedorandom) number starting from 0-0 all the way up to and including 6-6. You have to add the outcome in your head but i think that would be more educational. You might also want to add a reset button to clear the display to 0-0 after each turn.

Well anyway this circuit was just something to get started, you'll have to experiment with it to get exactly what you want.
 

nettron1000

New Member
Mechie, you got me thinking about that and i realized theres a simple way to do that, heres what i came up with:





This circuit should display random numbers from 00 to 12.

Again this is just a block diagram, it would have to be experimented with to get it working properly.
 

Electric Rain

New Member
...we could right? :lol:

Edit: I'll answer my own question. NO!!! Stupid! Yes, I'm calling myself stupid. I took a closer look, and it is nothing more then two 1-6 dice in one schematic! :roll: Now, everyone should know it like it is... I'M STUPID!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :lol: So needless to say, I need some help... bad. :cry: I can't work very well with things that aren't schematics. Block diagrams, don't really tell me much, I'm just staring out, as you may be able to see from my sig.
 

i-am-kloot

New Member
PICs?

I was wondering if you had considerd using a PIC? I have used 16f627 and 16f628 in the past. Although i don't know if you have access to any programming capabilities, it's just a thought. All the best
 

Electric Rain

New Member
Yes I have thought about using a PIC. Given I don’t know anything about their programming, but I’ll have to learn I guess. This should be very easy to do this with a PIC, but the cost of a programmer comes to mind too. Ok, this is what I’ll do. I will make a dual matrix type, and use that until my finances and skills get sharper, then I will probably build the dual 7-segment using a pic. Yeah… yeah, that’s what I’ll do.  So unless someone knows how I can do this without a pic (or can help me in construction and/or programming with a pic), then until I get the programmer, and unless I have trouble with the dual matrix, bye! And thank you so much everyone! :D
 

Exo

Active Member
nettron1000 said:
You can use just about any power supply voltage within the voltage range of the ICs, a 9 volt battery or a 6 volt battery pack would be fine.
74-series require 5V supply, a bit lower and they dont work, a bit more and they bust...
 

nettron1000

New Member
74-series require 5V supply, a bit lower and they dont work, a bit more and they bust...
Good point Exo, but note i said within the voltage range of the IC's. If you use 74HCxx it will work with a 2 to 6 volt supply. With a higher supply, and using 74LSxx, a 5 volt regulator IC such as a 7805 would be a must.

The block diagram is a very rough draft and not to be considered a complete design, its really just a guide.
 
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