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electro magnet

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holla people.

i trying to make a 9volt elecromagnet.can any one help.
a part of my project.

i details in how many coil and windings would help.
a chart would help.
cause i totally forgot the theory, now i have to do the research all again.
i never thought that this be asked this irretates


thanks in advance
 

Mike_2545

Super Moderator
If you plan on using a 9 volt battery, it will be one short lived electromagnet.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You may be able to get a 9V battery to power the electromagnet for a reasonable period of time but it would require many turns of fine wire. The magnetic field of an electromagnet is determined by it's ampere-turns, so the more turns, the higher field for a given current.

For example 36AWG copper wire has a resistance of about 0.415Ω/ft. For 100mA of current, the needed wire coil resistance would be 9V/0.1 = 90Ω. This would require 90/0.415 = 216ft. of wire, giving 21.6 ampere-turns. Of course winding that much fine wire (36AWG is 5mil, about the size of a thick human hair) on a core without breaking it may require a coil winding machine.
 

Roff

Well-Known Member
You may be able to get a 9V battery to power the electromagnet for a reasonable period of time but it would require many turns of fine wire. The magnetic field of an electromagnet is determined by it's ampere-turns, so the more turns, the higher field for a given current.

For example 36AWG copper wire has a resistance of about 0.415Ω/ft. For 100mA of current, the needed wire coil resistance would be 9V/0.1 = 90Ω. This would require 90/0.415 = 216ft. of wire, giving 21.6 ampere-turns. Of course winding that much fine wire (36AWG is 5mil, about the size of a thick human hair) on a core without breaking it may require a coil winding machine.
Wouldn't that be 21.6 ampere-feet?:D
The number of turns would be dependent on the diameter of the coil.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
And the actual strength of the magnet will depend highly on the core.
 
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