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Electric bicycles.

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
I have done a lot of biking my entire life, but with the older age I cannot bike as far or as challenging.

Having said that, I borrowed an E-bicycle the other day and was beyond delighted! I plan to purchase one soon, perhaps this coming Christmas season.

However, my concern here is reliability, and specifically, battery reliability.
Those packs are expensive, and I don't want to be replacing packs every couple of years.

Are there any bicycle enthusiasts out there which also can share experiences on E-bike ownership?
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Do you know what type of battery is used? Do you have a link to the one you're thinking of buying?

Mike.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Don't seek a bike that claims batteries last more than two years. The batteries take a beating and should be considered a consumable item and Budget buying a new batttery (batteries) every two years. You should include..
1) purchase price of biannual battery replacement.
2) longevity/availability of batteries 2, 4 and 6 years from now.

I would go with a Specialized brand bike. Specialized has been around for years - I earned extra money on weekends before I had kids assembling Specialized mountain bikes at a local bike shop so they e been around and my RockHopper and Stump Jumper are worth about what I paid for them years ago. Also, the service is going to be available for this brand - locally.

Stay away from brands that have a lot of gadgets that your local bike shop won't try to fix or don't know how to fix.

Here's a list of reasonable manufacturers.
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
I have seen many, and in all instances there are lithium packs. In 24 to 48 volt varieties.

In other forums I have been advised that I should plan in replacing them every 5 years, sometimes sooner.

Those packs are expensive, thus I wanted to know if anyone has had any actual riding experience.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I have seen many, and in all instances there are lithium packs. In 24 to 48 volt varieties.

In other forums I have been advised that I should plan in replacing them every 5 years, sometimes sooner.

Those packs are expensive, thus I wanted to know if anyone has had any actual riding experience.
Presumably they just use 18650's, so you could rebuild the battery pack anyway - even Tesla's use 18650's :D
 

camerart

Active Member
Hi,
I modified my mountain bike, by adding an electric back wheel, a regulator, plus 9x 3cell lithium iron 5000Mw, model batteries. This was three years ago and it is stil working fine.
You need to be mechanically able to fit it, but I think this is perhaps the cheapest way.

It pushes me up hills, and has gone 25 miles, but I haven't done that for a while, so I don't know what it will do now.

My battery pack is not guaranteed, so I try to be very careful especially when charging it. It needs a 9 cell capable parallel balance connection.

Good luck, they're briliant!
Camerart.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
That is exactly why a U.S.-based brand name bicycle manufacturer would be the only ones on my list.
 

Diver300

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Escaping from a burning bicycle doesn't seem quite a frightening as a burning car or a burning house.

The laptop this is being written on is being charged and is resting on top of soft furnishings. I don't expect it to catch fire, but it would do a lot more damage if it caught fire than if one of my bikes did.

(My bikes aren't electric, but if I do get any electric ones, they will be stored in the same places)
 

camerart

Active Member
Hi,
I would like to know what circumstances lead up to a battery fire. As has been said, Laptops, phones and many other things are in our houses being charged all of the time.
If a battery gets over charged, or perhaps too fast, or maybe gets hot because of current draw, then it could get a short, and catch fire.
Our road will be filled up with electric vehicles soo, what will a pile up look like then?
C
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Hi,
I would like to know what circumstances lead up to a battery fire. As has been said, Laptops, phones and many other things are in our houses being charged all of the time.
If a battery gets over charged, or perhaps too fast, or maybe gets hot because of current draw, then it could get a short, and catch fire.
Our road will be filled up with electric vehicles soo, what will a pile up look like then?
C
Shouldn't be a concern - seeing as American petrol cars already burst in to flames and explode at the slightest bump :D

At least according to Hollywood :D

Car battery packs are full of safety features - so it's unlikely that any issues would occur, as it would need a number of entirely unlikely and different events to happen at the same time.
 

camerart

Active Member
Shouldn't be a concern - seeing as American petrol cars already burst in to flames and explode at the slightest bump :D

At least according to Hollywood :D

Car battery packs are full of safety features - so it's unlikely that any issues would occur, as it would need a number of entirely unlikely and different events to happen at the same time.
Hi N,
This could have been a response to my post #6, as I 'made' the battery. When I chanrge it, I have a temp control, and a proper charger.
I was thinking about pile ups, when batteries get squashed.
C
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Hi N,
This could have been a response to my post #6, as I 'made' the battery. When I chanrge it, I have a temp control, and a proper charger.
I was thinking about pile ups, when batteries get squashed.
C
I don't see as it will be anywhere near as dangerous as 20 gallons of petrol spilt everywhere :D

And again, it the case of an accident it would require multiple unlikely events to occur in order to catch fire.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I would like to know what circumstances lead up to a battery fire.
Most commonly, overcharging - either the whole battery pack due to in correct charge voltage or just wrong charger, or cell overcharge within a battery because there is no cell voltage balancing in use.

Without balance, cells can easily end up in different states of charge and one reach full charge and over-volt while the overall battery pack voltage is still within safe limits.

And fires (or at least overheating) are easily caused by physical damage or heavy impacts that damage the internal cell structure.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
There are only a few stinking smoking diesel cars here. Most cars here cleanly burn petrol in their engines, except the ones who are rear-ended by a drunk fool.
Many cars are hybrid or all-electric now. Their dangerous Lithium battery is safely protected by the chassis.
 

shortbus=

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
There are only a few stinking smoking diesel cars here
I'm betting there are more diesels than you know. The modern diesel car and pickup truck have a system the injects DEF, diesel exhaust fluid, into them. Because of people(know who I mean?) complaining of the smell.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I think only a few VW cars are diesel here.
Most trucks produce black smoke with each gear shift.
What about the noise of diesel engines smashing themselves to pieces? They are obvious.
 

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