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Dpst switch wiring

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kwame

Member
So long
i have been encountering problems wiring some DPST switches and wish you guys can help me out;the voltage in my country is 240VAC.I am much familiar with DPDT switch for reversing motors.

1.Firstly i want know how an illuminated Rocker switch with four leads (two on each side)240 VAC should be wired .I bought four rocker switches all got burnt out ;the last one even knocked out electricity in parts of my as one fuse blew.

2.I also need help to successfully wire a smaller rocker with three leads rated at 6AMP 240.
3.Lastly i need help to wire a DPST(ON/OFF) TOGGLE switch.
I AM TOTALLY CONFUSED!
Big ups KISS,RON ,CARBONZIT.............................
 
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Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Kwame, this would go much better if you could provide some part numbers of the switch(s). For example illuminated switches come in a variety of pin outs as well as lamp voltages. They are not always line voltage. Tell us what you are buying, what you have, part numbers, manufacturers and whatever information you may have.

Ron
 

carbonzit

Active Member
Well, more importantly, how did you wire the switch? Give us a diagram of some kind. If you blew a fuse in your residence, it's probably not because you used the wrong kind of switch, but because you wired it incorrectly.
 

kwame

Member
Hi Ron
i bought it from the electronics shop.These products are brought in from china with no part numbers,spec sheet etc.All of the the switched have 120/240 embossed behind them with the rating current and that is it.
Ron ,i think drawing on your experience you should be able to make some suggestions.
 
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kwame

Member
Hi Carbonzit
i connected one + wire and one - wire to the leads on one side simply connected the two other leads on the other to load.Got it?
 

carbonzit

Active Member
Hi Carbonzit
i connected one + wire and one - wire to the leads on one side simply connected the two other leads on the other to load.Got it?

No. What do you mean "+ wire and - wire"? Switches don't have plus or minus sides.

What are you connecting to the switch?

Remember that we cannot read your mind.

If you can't post a diagram, then try to explain explicitly what's connected to what. Be clear.
 

carbonzit

Active Member
I still have no idea what you're talking about: positive and neutral of what?

Here, Kwame, I'll try to help you out. I still have no idea what you're trying to do. Typically, a DPST switch is used to switch both sides of a line to a load, like this:

**broken link removed**

(There are other uses for such a switch, but this is a very common one.) This removes both sides of the line from the device being powered when the switch is off. Is this what you're trying to do?
 
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Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi Carbonzit
i connected one + wire and one - wire to the leads on one side simply connected the two other leads on the other to load.Got it?

The problem is without seeing this switch it is hard to guess how it is configured. For example the switch can have 4 terminals just like CB's example. But it needs to be figured out where they are on the sactual switch body. It becomes easy to connect some power, flip the switch and poof, you have a dead short. If you have an ohmmeter you can sit down with pencil and paper and draw the switch out. An example would be using CB's switch. That is a DPST (Double Pole Single Throw) switch. Using an ohmmeter see what contacts do what when the switch is opened and closed.

Sometimes illuminated switches have small symbols at the terminals so you can figure out how the lamp figures into things.

Ron
 

carbonzit

Active Member
Yes, it sounds like you rotated the switch contacts 90° and shorted out the line. "Ring out" the connections as Ron suggested so that you're sure which contacts are which.

In other words, make sure it's not connected like this:

**broken link removed**
 
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kwame

Member
Kudos

Thanks Ron,Carbonzit
I think you guys are really corect!I shorted the rocker switch by putting the live and neutral wires in the same path;it follows that whenever i closed/on the switch contacts there was always a flash poin.
I think i have learnt my lessons per the illuminated rocker switch.The same applies to the four pronged toggle switch with .

How do i resolve the problem with the three pronged rocker switch?May be use a single wire connection?Or not .
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The three terminal could be a few things but likely a SPDT (Single Pole Double Throw) switch. That would have a common and when in either position it makes contact with one or the other terminal. Switches actually become a world of their own.

Ron
 

carbonzit

Active Member
How do i resolve the problem with the three pronged rocker switch?May be use a single wire connection?Or not .

I can't remember from previous conversations, but do you have some kind of multimeter (digital or analog)? If not, you should definitely get one, since it seems you like to mess around with electricity and electronics.

Get a meter, set it to measure resistance, and use it to "ring out" the switch (that is, see which contact is connected to which contact for each position of the rocker).

If you don't have a meter, you can rig up a simple, safe tester using a battery and a small light (like a flashlight bulb) to test continuity. Either way, you should be able to figure out what's going on inside that switch.
 
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