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conductive epoxy

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KevinW

Member
I have this flashlight that uses an obsolete battery but I have found a similar replacement.
The problem is that I have to secure a positive type post to the new battery and I'm in need of a solution.
I have searched on line to find mixed results for what is available and now I'm wondering if anyone here has had good results with a product that is conductive, epoxy like and reasonably priced.
Thanks.

battery.JPG
 

alec_t

Well-Known Member
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I doubt any goop would have sufficient conductivity for flashlight use (I could be wrong). If it were me I'd just use a thin disc of plastic with a copper rivet through its centre. The disc could be just sandwiched in place in the battery compartment or else taped to the battery.
 

JonSea

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Long ago I used some epoxy containing silver to glue down transducer mounting pads in an explosive hazard zone. The mounting pads were required to provide a conductive path to ground via the machine they were attached to. Long story short, the expensive epoxy didn't work so well in that environment and the mounting pads were always falling off.
 
I believe the rear window defroster grid repair kits contain a conductive adhesive. But I don't know how conductive it is.
 

shortbus=

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I believe the rear window defroster grid repair kits contain a conductive adhesive. But I don't know how conductive it is.
I always thought that repair stuff was high resistance, because it is meant to be used in the heating track of the defroster. could be wrong though.
 

KevinW

Member
Thanks for the replies.
Alec may have given me another idea where I can cement a small nut into the center of the battery using non conductive JB Weld then put a screw of the proper length into the nut and loctite it in place.
JB is really strong epoxy and the screw would carry the voltage to the flashlight head as well could be used in the charger for the original battery.

battery2.JPG
 

KevinW

Member
Nigel;
That was a consideration but I'm not sure it's an option considering the heat it would take, I thought there might be a chance of distorting and destroying that little plastic ring that separates + from -.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Nigel;
That was a consideration but I'm not sure it's an option considering the heat it would take, I thought there might be a chance of distorting and destroying that little plastic ring that separates + from -.
Soldering directly to batteries is commonplace, and done all the time.
 
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