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Can you MAKE a vehicle remote?

Mark563

New Member
Hello, people,

I have a 2007 Mitsubishi Outlander XLS, which uses a F.A.S.T. (Free-Hand Advanced Security Transmitter)
"smart key remote transmitter", part # 8637A025.

key fob.jpg

With that remote in my pocket, I simply touch the door handle to unlock the doors.
And just turn a Cap on the ignition switch to start the vehicle (no key insertion needed).

I want to get a second Remote, just in case I lose the one that I received with the used vehicle.
The problem… the local stealer/dealer wants $341, plus $94 for the blank key, plus $120 to program it.
THAT's just bloody ridiculous.
For a Used one on Ebay, $285, with an already-cut key, plus programming somewhere.

WHAT makes this thing so much more expensive than the $10 Mitsubishi part # HYQ12ABA
that has similar buttons, but fits some 2001 vehicles?
What does this thing do?... besides just receive and transmit a certain frequency?
I'm thinking that almost Any other model of key fob (from ANY car make?) Could be
programmed to send/receive the needed frequencies. Yes? No? WHY Not?

I'd really appreciate hearing your thoughts.
Thanks.
Mark563
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Any other model of key fob (from ANY car make?) Could be
programmed to send/receive the needed frequencies. Yes? No? WHY Not?
Probably not, since it's likely most manufacturers use unique digital codes for their fobs.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
What does this thing do?... besides just receive and transmit a certain frequency?
I'm thinking that almost Any other model of key fob (from ANY car make?) Could be
programmed to send/receive the needed frequencies. Yes? No? WHY Not?
Remotes don't send 'frequencies', it would be an incredibly poor security device if it did!.

They send digital codes, modulated on an RF carrier - and the codes are quite probably 'rolling' as well.

So it's not a simple thing to duplicate, for obvious reasons.
 

rjenkinsgb

Active Member
Another point is that the fobs themselves are pre-programmed with fixed data, some of which allows it to be recognised by the vehicle security system and other parts give the fob a unique ID.

When a new fob is added, the vehicle system is made to learn and store the new fobs unique identity - the fob itself is not changed in any way.

Additionally, with fobs for keyless systems, there is an extra transponder that can receive a signal from the vehicle system and respond, to show the key is present.
The basic lock/unlock remote fobs do not have that.
 

Dave HW

New Member
Hello, people,

I have a 2007 Mitsubishi Outlander XLS, which uses a F.A.S.T. (Free-Hand Advanced Security Transmitter)
"smart key remote transmitter", part # 8637A025.

View attachment 117369

With that remote in my pocket, I simply touch the door handle to unlock the doors.
And just turn a Cap on the ignition switch to start the vehicle (no key insertion needed).

I want to get a second Remote, just in case I lose the one that I received with the used vehicle.
The problem… the local stealer/dealer wants $341, plus $94 for the blank key, plus $120 to program it.
THAT's just bloody ridiculous.
For a Used one on Ebay, $285, with an already-cut key, plus programming somewhere.

WHAT makes this thing so much more expensive than the $10 Mitsubishi part # HYQ12ABA
that has similar buttons, but fits some 2001 vehicles?
What does this thing do?... besides just receive and transmit a certain frequency?
I'm thinking that almost Any other model of key fob (from ANY car make?) Could be
programmed to send/receive the needed frequencies. Yes? No? WHY Not?

I'd really appreciate hearing your thoughts.
Thanks.
Mark563
Mark, there are locksmith stores that can replicate your key for significantly less $$$.

Autozone comes to mind.


Good luck

Dave HW
 

Mark563

New Member
Thanks for the replies, people.
Mind you, I know Nothing about the electronic technicalities involved here.
"Modulated digital codes on an RF carrier"? That's Greek to me.

Maybe some helpful information...
I have both the Service Manual and the Technical Information Manual.
The TIM says that you're correct, Nigel… the transmitted signals include an encrypted code,
as well as a rolling code that changes each time a signal is sent.
So what?! I think that would still just require a programmed chip. Nothing very expensive there.

Darn… I was thinking that the $10 key fobs would have the same technology.
But JRW (And the TIM) says that the fob includes a transponder that receives a signal from the car,
then sends a signal back to the car. OK… that makes it a bit more complicated. But $400 worth?

I had visions of one of you geniuses (genii?) designing one of these things, and we could
make a few $ selling them on Ebay.
Probably not gonna' happen, eh? Ah, well… thanks anyway for the conversation.

I'll check with Autozone, Dave. Thanks.

Mark563
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Thanks for the replies, people.
Mind you, I know Nothing about the electronic technicalities involved here.
"Modulated digital codes on an RF carrier"? That's Greek to me.

Maybe some helpful information...
I have both the Service Manual and the Technical Information Manual.
The TIM says that you're correct, Nigel… the transmitted signals include an encrypted code,
as well as a rolling code that changes each time a signal is sent.
So what?! I think that would still just require a programmed chip. Nothing very expensive there.
Except you've got to duplicate, EXACTLY, a highly secure encryption system. The whole point of it is to stop people duplicating keys and stealing cars.

Darn… I was thinking that the $10 key fobs would have the same technology.
But JRW (And the TIM) says that the fob includes a transponder that receives a signal from the car,
then sends a signal back to the car. OK… that makes it a bit more complicated. But $400 worth?
Anything to do with cars is expensive, and as already mentioned you probably need to program the car systems to include the new key.
 

narkeleptk

New Member
I would say "its possible" but not worth the effort. I'm in the advanced automotive locksmithing business and can tell you there are indeed tools available that will write the firmware on many prox remotes. We use them for resetting used remotes so they can be used again. I'm not sure on the firmware for your particular remote but the database is growing daily so if not yet I'm sure soon. I reckon if you could build the remote to match yours part for part then you should be able to write the firmware and then program that key as if you where programming any other key.

if your system uses a rolling code (most Mitsubishi in US do not use rolling codes, no idea about EU) then its not possible to ever "clone" your remote. The way rolling code works is every time the switch is turned the code changes. making either the cloned version or your original to be left on the old code. So any key(s) you wanted to work with your car consistently would need to take one of the available spots. Typically prox systems have 4 - 6 available spots.
 

Mark563

New Member
Thanks for your input, Mr. Nark.
Yes, this is a Proximity thing, and the TIM says that this system DOES use "rolling" codes,
and you're correct... up to Four keys can be programmed.
Coincidentally, just today, I stopped by a Locksmith shop where there was
a sign out front about "car remotes / chipped keys".
He was very surprised to find that a replacement for this vehicle would cost $300.
Plus his $40 charge for programming the new one.
And this remote works Only on the 2007 vehicles... applicable to no other years.
I had previously read somewhere that you Need one remote to program another one.
That is: if you don't have one remote, it's allegedly Much more complicated... read: expensive.
He said he could program a new one, even after I lose the existing remote. Kool.
So, the bottom line... I bought this vehicle with only one operable remote...
Hopefully, I won't lose this remote. But if I do, it will cost $340 to replace. Darn.
Thanks very much for your very helpful posts, people.
 

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