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Audio equalizer

Prenz69

New Member
I have to build a 5 band equalizer using microcontrollers. I have chosen NE5532 for the job. Is this sufficient enough? Do I need to design an amplifier as well? If so why?:rolleyes:
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I have to build a 5 band equalizer using microcontrollers.
Why?

Do you know what an equalizer is?

What are the microcontrollers for? Why do you think they are needed?

If you search for audio equalizer schematic, you will get dozens of designs to study.

ak
 

Prenz69

New Member
This is an assessed project. It is compulsory to use microcontrollers for this purpose. I got a few schematics. The best one had used LM833. That is nowhere to be found in my area right now. NE5532 is the substitute I choose.

What I need to know is whether this would work?
Can the equalizer work alone or does it need an amplifier as well?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
This is an assessed project. It is compulsory to use microcontrollers for this purpose. I got a few schematics. The best one had used LM833. That is nowhere to be found in my area right now. NE5532 is the substitute I choose.

Both of those are opamps, not micro-controllers.

What I need to know is whether this would work?
Can the equalizer work alone or does it need an amplifier as well?

Depends what you want to do with it, it can do either.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I think that there may be a translation problem here.

I have to build a 5 band equalizer using microcontrollers.
What he should have said is:
"I have to build a 5 band equalizer using integrated circuits."

I think that the mis understanding goes like this:

An op-amp is (usually) a type of integrated circuit.
A microcontroller is a type of integrated circuit.
BUT, an op-amp is NOT the same as a microcontroller.

JimB
 

Prenz69

New Member
I think that there may be a translation problem here.


What he should have said is:
"I have to build a 5 band equalizer using integrated circuits."

I think that the mis understanding goes like this:

An op-amp is (usually) a type of integrated circuit.
A microcontroller is a type of integrated circuit.
BUT, an op-amp is NOT the same as a microcontroller.

JimB
Yes thank you for the clarification
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I was about to suggest "microcircuit" instead of microcontroller.

In that case, the 5532 is an excellent choice for general purpose audio work. It is old, but readily available, and it is much better than most other opamps of its time.

Almost all 5-band or graphic equalizers use opamps to make up for the signal attenuation through the filter components. In this way, the output signal level is approximately equal to the input signal level.

For more than three bands, a common approach is to use opamps to form a synthetic inductor as par of an L-C filter circuit, with one or two opamps per frequency band.
I got a few schematics. The best one had used LM833.

Please post a link to that project page or schematic.

ak
 

Prenz69

New Member
I was about to suggest "microcircuit" instead of microcontroller.

In that case, the 5532 is an excellent choice for general purpose audio work. It is old, but readily available, and it is much better than most other opamps of its time.

Almost all 5-band or graphic equalizers use opamps to make up for the signal attenuation through the filter components. In this way, the output signal level is approximately equal to the input signal level.

For more than three bands, a common approach is to use opamps to form a synthetic inductor as par of an L-C filter circuit, with one or two opamps per frequency band.


Please post a link to that project page or schematic.

ak
https://bestengineeringprojects.com/5-band-audio-equalizer-circuit-using-lm833/ this is what I got
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Pretty decent circuit. Next: power. With a few adjustments, a 5532 can be dropped into that schematic. However, consider changing the power source to two 12 supplies in a +/-12 V arrangement.

If your question is whether or not you need to design an *additional* amplifier stage, the answer is no. IC2:A is the output amplifier, and its gain can be made adjustable if you want that extra control.

Is this a school project?

Are you going to build the circuit, or is this just a design exercise?

ak
 

danadak

Active Member
You could use switch capacitor filters -



Or google "audio equalizer FFT".....


Regards, Dana.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You might want to consider a circuit using gyrators (which emulate an inductor), since the circuit can be somewhat simpler, such as discussed here.
 

Prenz69

New Member
You could use switch capacitor filters -



Or google "audio equalizer FFT".....


Regards, Dana.
Thank you for your insight
 

Ramussons

Active Member
I have to build a 5 band equalizer using microcontrollers. I have chosen NE5532 for the job. Is this sufficient enough? Do I need to design an amplifier as well? If so why?:rolleyes:
No, those are OpAmps and they have nothing to do with microcontrollers.
There are Tone control IC's that use DC voltages instead of potentiometers for Tone Control. I do not know if these IC's are available today.
LM1036
LMC1982
You can use a uCcontroller to vary the voltages that control the tone effects.
 
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