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Any Chefs out there?

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Mikebits

Well-Known Member
I once went to a BBQ where a Turkey was cooked in the Grill for something like 3 hours, and it was sooo good.

I have an old friend coming by in a few days and I thought a BBQ would be nice. I have this nice 3 lbs. Pork roast that I thought might be great to BBQ. First my grill is the old fashion charcol type, so I really can't control the temp too much. Has anyone ever tried this? I was thinking maybe roast it in the oven for about 40 mins, then place it in the BBQ for the final coup de gras.

Any suggestions?

Thanks
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
I've prepped chicken that way only in the microwave first and then off tothe grill. However, IMHO you can't beat grilling meat from start to finish and monitoring it every step of the way to assure scrumptous, tasty results. You might want to look up a good marinating solution for bbq'd pork roast rather than just slap the meat on the grill.
 

Mikebits

Well-Known Member
Thanks, my only concern is the lack of temp control. What if I seer it on the grill first, then wrap it in aluminum foil.
 

arrie

New Member
We do a thing here in SA called a spitbraai.
You try to open your meat as much as possible, it's then mounted on a home-made metal contraption(the spit), planted into the ground.
the charcoal is made elsewhere and, very important - using a shovel, place coals underneath the meat on the ground. Charcoal is added as time goes by, real big thing, but yes it takes very long.
Your temp control is your hand, and no you don't place it in/on the fire or meat, you feel the air surrounding the meat, kinda something you develop over time.
You can braai (bbq) a whole sheep this way while having a kuier (social) with your friends.
But start early, kids and woman can get grumpy if you don't.
Oh and the spit is rotated from time to time, the real fancy guys have built a system where the spit is rotated very slowly using an electric motor.
But the "feeling the air with you hand" bit is quite important, it's essential for the heat to be at a right temperature continually.
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
He, he --- have you been hanging around with some lost Amazonian tribe?
 

arrie

New Member
Did you not know, afrikaaners are the lost tribe, but not from the amazon.

I forgot to tell him about the basting process, do you think I should?
 

Bob Scott

New Member
My second half BBQs roasts all the time but we use a gas BBQ. 3 lbs. is small. She rubs the roast with seasoning first, like garlic powder and lemon pepper or whatever you like, then put it on the rotisserie. Cook on high for half an hour to seal the exterior so it won't lose much juice. Reduce flame to minimum until cooked. (Keep checking with a meat thermometer). Cooking slowly helps keep the roast tender. Cooking fast makes it tough.

Don't use foil. BBQ means smoking the food. Foil keeps the smoke away. You may as well use an electric oven.

Microwave ovens toughen protiens like meat, so afterwards you can saw the roast into strips for resoling your shoes.
 
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Mikebits

Well-Known Member
Thanks for all the suggestions and the link, I like the idea of moving the coals to one side of the grill thus creating a cool side. I think I will give it a shot :)
 

arrie

New Member
Basting for a spitbraai would be a combination of oils, vinegars, spices, garlic, and all sorts, but you needed a lot of it.
The spitbraai basting used to become a massive competition as to who's is best.

Some folk even had syringes with needles to inject it into the meat, we never used to do so, just baste it on the outside really often, as to not let the meat get dry and tough.
When done, the people would come and get their servings from the spit. the chef would cut slices of from wherever the "customer" wanted it.

I remember, people used to almost fight to be amongst the first in line for that very crispy and overly salty outside slice.

Mmmmmmm, oops, there goes my cholesterol again.
 

The Mad Professor

New Member
Syringes do have a bad press and this does put people off from using them I feel. Which is a shame for they can help create some delightful dishes. Roasted banana (skin on) shot through with maple syrup, peel and drop into a bowl of ice-cream.. and if you know the secret of of how to slice them without breaking the skin its a real party piece to perform.


Side Thought---
Temperature control of a BBQ might be a interesting project for someone.. on the BBC show 'Tomorrows World' many years ago they demonstrated a BBQ with a sub-woofer attached. Banging away at a few hertz it acted as a 'fan' moving air back and forth over the coals, all it lacked was some temperature sensing system for feedback
 

Boncuk

New Member
Hi Mike,

if you want to do some extraordinary good cooking, dig a hole (cylinder) in your garden, at a slope would be perfect. Clay behaves almost like a stone oven and makes the meat tender and juicy. If your ground constists of sand you might as well forget about it.

Dig a hole big enough for a huge fire. Use wood or charcoal and have the fire heat the walls of the oven real hot (250 deg. C). Put the glowing leftovers of the fire on a small pile add some pieces of wood or charcoal, and hang the meat down in a basket.

An entire sheep can be hung in toto without any supporting basket, just have the support strong enough (steel rope), so it wouldn't fall into the fire. (result in that case = charcoal :D )

Use only the most necessary ingredients like salt and a little pepper. The rest can be done before serving. Close the top carefully with an iron or concrete lid leaving a small hole (1-2") for air and smoke exhaust. At the buttom poke a 1/2" inch water pipe through the wall for an air inlet and close enough to the fire for a direct air stream.

By the amount of smoke venting from top you can see if the fire is too big and close the air inlet accordingly. If the smoke venting is as dense as that of a factory chimney the fire is definetely too hot. :D

An entire sheep takes about six hours to get baked. After eating that you don't want to eat any sheep not baked that way. It's not only delicious, it's marvelous. Voila! That's the real thing.

Hans
 

Hero999

Banned
Thanks, my only concern is the lack of temp control. What if I seer it on the grill first, then wrap it in aluminum foil.
Get a temperature probe and make sure the temperature in the middle is >82°C, I think that's right for poultry.
 
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