Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Allowed frequency band and transmission power at homes and industry

Status
Not open for further replies.

alphacat

New Member
Hello.

Could anyone please tell me where could i find the allowed frequency band and transmission power at homes and industry?

I'm talking about having units that wirelessy communicate with each other at homes/industry.

Thank you very much.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
You question is so vague it's not possible to answer, aside from saying Google it.
What spectrum range are you interested, what power limit?

In the US there are many bands of spectrum dedicated to specific uses which are allows certain tolerances on transmit frequency, modulation methods, and power. So you have to mention at the very least the frequency band you're looking for. Home or Industry is irrelevant, doesn't play a roll at all. The FCC has similar regulating branches in many other countries, some countries have none at all.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
I'm thinking of the few really small poor countries that simple have no need for a regulatory body of that nature.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I'm thinking of the few really small poor countries that simple have no need for a regulatory body of that nature.

Are they any such?, a regulatory body doesn't have to cost much - and the issuing of licences should make it self funding anyway.

You can't just transmit what yoiu want were you want, that would cause chaos, and outside the country as well.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
the "Russian Woodpecker" was an over-the-horizon radar, and had a nasty habit of coming up on various frequencies that were in use elsewhere. although i remember hearing it often on frequencies that weren't in use as well, so i don't think it's frequency selection was always with the intent of jamming, but it may have been used as a jammer from time to time... there was also a US version that used a frequency modulated sweep at about a 20hz rate, but it locked out SW broadcast and ham bands, so it wasn't well known. i do remember being an RTTY operator in the Army, and having it come up on our net frequency one night...


the OP is from France, and the CEPT is where he should look first.
 

ke5frf

New Member
The FCC only regulates the USA and its territories

This is per the ITU treaty on frequency spectrum use. The ITU is the international agency that "governs" (not really) spectrum use. Each independant nation follows ITU treaty or chooses not to on its own accord.
 

ke5frf

New Member
I'm thinking of the few really small poor countries that simple have no need for a regulatory body of that nature.

It has nothing to do with poverty. Island nations in the middle of the Pacific follow international treaty. Having a regulatory agency is here nor there.

It depends on the politics of the government and nothing more. It isn't a matter of money but rather a matter of taking treaty serious enough to give it any priority.

The FCC is one of the worst agencies in that regard. Take a listen on the 11 meter band sometime if you don't believe me.
 

stevez

Active Member
Worth noting is that some countries have rules related to the emissions in terms of power/freuqency/mode and they further regulate the equipment based on the manufacturer. An example (that may be incorrect but I use it to illustrate a point) is that a WiFi router may be accepted by the FCC as long as used as originally manufactured. Modifications to the device that aren't part of the manufacturer's plan are not allowed (alternative antennas, etc).

As others will point out, the enforcement of regulations is quite variable and is probably more dependent on who an offender might bother.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
the 11 meter (CB) band is a wasteland. CB was only a rarely used hobby band until 1970 when the FCC expanded it to 40 channels and dropped the requirement for a (free) license application. not to mention all of the media hype that multiplied the popularity of it...
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

Top