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A new Forum: High Voltage? Have your say..

Do you think we should create a High Voltage forum?

  • Yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
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ElectroMaster

Administrator
Hi Guys,

I wanted to put up a poll to see what you think of adding a High Voltage forum.

I feel that it is a rather large interest relating to this type of project and would allow us to clearly display a safety warning to make it as safe as possible.

What do you think?

If you vote please leave a comment as to why.
 

EN0

Member
Good Idea ElectroMaster, high voltage can be very dangerous. Safety should be a primary facet of this forum if issued.
 

microtexan

New Member
Yes, safety is certainly a consideration and I think any and all subject would be treated well here.
Thanks for the consideration.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
I would be delighted to see one! Its a fairly common hobby interest with loads of unique things related to it. :)
 

Torben

Well-Known Member
I haven't had the time to play with HV, but I know that this is the first place I'd come for help, and I know that there are members here whose advice I would trust. (OK, so there are also members whose advice I would NOT trust, but let's ignore that--I know who they are :) .)

Anybody who's read my posts knows I'm into safety (no offense tcm--I agree with some of your other posts on a lot of points!) but knowing that there was a place with names I know and respect would be awfully nice.

I'm for it.


Regards,

Torben
 
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tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
No offense taken. ;)

I do take what I deem as high voltage with above average safety precautions.:)

Where I draw the line is just higher than what most would feel comfortable with!:D

Not everyone here has had full MSHA training to work around up to 23KV.:eek:
 

Warpspeed

Member
Probably most of us have been intrigued by high voltages as applied to image intensifiers, cathode ray tubes, tesla coils, and other high impedance low current applications.

But some high voltage projects capable of high current discharges that I see around the internet, really scare me.
 

grim

New Member
what's the definition of high voltage?

some members will have only 'played' with 5V DC so a 9v PP3 battery will be putting out 'high voltage' :)

is the thinking anything from domestic supply upwards?
 

smanches

New Member
I would think that above 50V would be considered high voltage. The main pupose of differentiating between the two would be for safety's sake.
 

RODALCO

Well-Known Member
Good idea.
And make some basic high voltage tips sticky in the first thread, Safety is paramount here.

A lot of inexperienced people trying to work on, or fix mains operated equipment and shouldn't even consider working on it.

Especially MOT's with have leathal output voltages of 2.2 kV and will kill.
 

killivolt

Well-Known Member
I'm for it.

so whats the verdict?
You don't walk blindly into such subjects and not all forum members have had a say yet.

I think most likely it will continue to be debated as to the approach of this subject. I'm delighted to think that forum members will have a say and be able to raise objection to a Student who has vain Idea's about tesla and has the money to put his work into a real project.

The result could be catastrophic. I think visiting Locations where they have such devices to experience it' effects or focusing on the pure physics of what is potential how to stay out of it's path would be very beneficial.

" nullo adversante, iacta alea est, Oderint dum metuat "

kv
 

Menticol

Active Member
YEAH! :D

But Hey! I have seen this same thread before! :eek:

At that time, they concluded that It would be too dangerous and non viable, because any shocked person would be a headache in legal and ethical terms for the forum.

I disagree. People who is incapable of following the advice and/or warnings of more experienced persons (even when the advice may be just: "No" or "Don't Do it" will injure themselves in a great variety of ways, no electricity required.

And about the misuse the information shown here... they will do the same with everything on the net, no electricity required.

So, instead of protecting anybody or anything with the "non HV" policy, we are privating ourselves of exchanging very nice information.

1) A simple disclaimer must be added, so Electromaster can sleep well: "Everyone's under its own risk" Entering or posting on the HV section means that the user acepted it.

2) A series of Basic HV Safety Guidelines. Here they are!
Safety Guidelines for High Voltage and/or Line Powered Equipment

3) I'm a noob, and I will remain as one for a very long time. But watching other noob's posting "I want make tezlacoil send me diagram now" drives me nuts. As the sticky thread says, ignoring them is a good measure, to be maintained from the birth of the section.
 
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Sceadwian

Banned
I think the current forums generally tend to absorb the HV posts well, but it might not be a bad idea, it is an interesting part of electronics. I find it a little amusing about the legalities of many HV devices though, specifically sparkgap tesla coils and most other tesla coil designs. Seems a fuzzy area considering how hardcore many users (myself included) come down on people that want to make jammers or the locking of piracy related threads. The RF output of even a moderatly powered tesla coil breaks just about every countries airwave non-interference laws.
 
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Sceadwian

Banned
The voltage and frequency an arc welder operates at are several orders of magnitude less than a tesla coil, just high current. The distance a tesla coil spark jumps is so long in many cases the ionized streamer itself will act as an antenna, and the driven frequency is so high in harmonic content that it reaches well up into the AM band. The distance an arc welder jumps at is so small it's effective radiated power would be very low. I've never used any Tesla coils myself or tested them with a radio, but their basic operating principles make them a fantastic possible source of RF noise over a huge band.
 

Warpspeed

Member
The voltage and frequency an arc welder operates at are several orders of magnitude less than a tesla coil, just high current. The distance a tesla coil spark jumps is so long in many cases the ionized streamer itself will act as an antenna, and the driven frequency is so high in harmonic content that it reaches well up into the AM band. The distance an arc welder jumps at is so small it's effective radiated power would be very low. I've never used any Tesla coils myself or tested them with a radio, but their basic operating principles make them a fantastic possible source of RF noise over a huge band.
Once an arc is formed the wide band noise current in some fairly long cables is huge, maybe several hundreds of amps.
It is not the actual arc that radiates, but the fairly effective antenna formed by the long welding cables.
 
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