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3 output flipflop diagram?

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devid3an

New Member
Hi, I'm new here and very new to electronics. I was hoping someone could point me towards an existing circuit that i could use or design for me a simple circuit?
I have been hobby crafting some Rodin coils and experimenting with different designs.
i have built a 3 coil induction experimental coil and would like to flip between circuits.

i will use 12v and it is a small coil (havn't completed it yet) and i would like to create 2 separate circuits.
One that powers 2 coils at a time and cycles (coil 1/2, then 2/3, then 3/1, repeat
the other powers 1 coil at a time cycles (1, then 2, then 3, repeat)
and if possible variable.

any help at all i would appreciate it.

thanks
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
"powers 2 coils" with what? Are you talking about switching DC through the coils, or some other kind of signal? The switching patterns are very simple and easy to do in basic circuits, but what is being switched?

ak
 

devid3an

New Member
Thanks for your response

It’s 12vdc 0.5A per coil switching between the 3 coils ( Frequency being variable if possible, 50hz as a mid point, range as much as possible without adding excessive complication )
And inductance I haven’t completed them yet I’ll have to work that out and come back to you.
Is this enough information to get an idea of what is required - sorry I’m pretty inexperienced.
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
When switching DC through an inductor there are two things to consider, the transient current and the steady-state current. The transient current is limited by the inductance and lasts only a few microseconds. The steady state current lasts as long as the DC is connected and is limited by the resistance of the wire in the inductor. To limit the current to 0.5 A at 12 V, the coil must have a resistance of 24 ohms. That's a lot. For example, very fine wire such as wire-wrap wire is 30 gauge, and you would need 228 feet of it or more to keep the current below 0.5 A.

http://www.interfacebus.com/AWG-table-of-different-wire-gauge-resistance.html

ak
 
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