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24v DC Power Supply (Help & Information Wanted Urgently)

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ampthetex

New Member
Hi, I am attempting to re-build an old Chilton M10-2 Mk 5 Mixing Desk, and I need a 24v DC power supply for it. The only problem is, that I only have the following information to go from;

The original connector on the unit was a 240deg DIN, only 2 wires connected to it (1 red and 1 Black) the black one also connects to the centre of the connector and the guy from the company said it was a tap. (+12v, and -12v = 24v DC.)

I have used a PC power supply to see if the unit works with those voltages by using the +12v, and -12v rails on the PC Power Supply connector, it powered up and worked all ok.
I personally think it needs more power than the PC Power Supply is giving it because the gain amplifiers are weak, and need to be turned up full.

I was wondering if you have any ideas of what could be subsituted in etc. Or any ideas of what to try without killing me or the desk ?

Thanks

Steven Price
 

stevez

Active Member
This may not be much help but if I were faced with that situation I'd measure the voltage while the supply is connected and the equipment is in operation - especially while it is in the modes where you think performance is lacking. I would think that if the supply voltage remained at 24 vdc at all times then it would suggest that the supply is able to deliver all that is needed (though the supply may be overloaded but that's a different problem). If the supply voltage is down significantly it would seem that the power supply is overloaded.

As a test you might take 2 automotive batteries and wire them in series for a 24 volt supply. Be very careful though - the current that can be delivered by these batteries can be dangerous. My personal practice is to connect a fuse holder right at the battery terminals just in case ....
 

ezwizzard

New Member
Hi, I'am not sure what type of circuit your trying to fix, but it sounds like to me, that you need a power supply with a higher current rating.The problem with a pc power supply is that there are two different current ratings for +12 and -12 on a pc power supply. The plus may be 8 amps but the minus may only be .5 amps. I think your heading in the right direction thought. I think all you need is a different power supply with only one rating. As suggested you can try with the batteries, but be very careful if you short this circuit ,this thing will blow up in your face..be careful and safe. 8)
 

bmcculla

New Member
you can get fixed 13.5V supplies for charging car batteries (have a high amp rating) for a fair price. Some come with floating inputs which allows you to stack 2 in series for 27V. I think a plain old auto supply store will have them if not there are a bunch of online suppliers. They make adjustable ones if you are worried about going over 24V.
 

justDIY

Active Member
just grab a pair of isolated output 12v ac-dc switchers (smps)... wire them in series, and use the 'center tap' as your ground reference ... now you have +12 and -12

check out the surplus websites for your region, they should be really inexpensive
 
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