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100nF is equal to ?

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Torben

Well-Known Member
so micro is .1uF right?
No.

The 'u' in 'uF' is supposed to be a 'µ', meaning 'micro'. So 1 microfarad is 1µF is 1uF.

For your original question, micro is greater than nano is greater than pico. So 100nF is not going to be 0.1pF--that would be backward. 100nF is 0.1uF or 100000pF.

One microfarad is one-millionth of a Farad, and is therefore 0.000001F--or more easily written as 1uF.

One nanofarad is one billionth of a Farad, so it would take one thousand nanofarads to make one microfarad. One nanofarad is 1nF or 0.001uF.

One picofarad is one trillionth of a Farad, so it would take one thousand picofarads to make one nanofarad. One picofarad is 1pF or 0.001nF.

Perhaps the following would be useful (Google and Wikipedia often are): pico- - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Regards,

Torben
 

giftiger_wunsch

New Member
Check out the wikipedia page for SI prefixes, that might help you understand. These prefixes apply to all SI Units as well, not just farads.

Commonly-used 1000-fold orders of magnitude:

tera- x1,000,000,000,000
giga- x1,000,000,000
mega- x1,000,000
kilo- x1,000
(unit)
milli- x0.001
micro- x0.000,001
nano- x0.000,000,001
pico- x0.000,000,000,001

Hope that helps.
 
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Hero999

Banned
One thing: don't use milli-Farads, mF.

Some old schematics and components have mF instead of µF.

So I use µF for values up to 99,999µF and F for values > 0.1F or 100,000µF.
 

giftiger_wunsch

New Member
What's the reason for not using mF? I had noticed that it never appeared to be mentioned even when it seemed appropriate; does it clash with a different term mF?
 

Hero999

Banned
As I've said, old schematics use mF to denote micro-Farads.
 

Boncuk

New Member
Some countries don't have the "µ" in their alphabet. So mF and µF could be mixed up easily.
 

giftiger_wunsch

New Member
As I've said, old schematics use mF to denote micro-Farads.
Sorry, I misunderstood your explanation. You said some old schematics use mF rather than µF, I didn't realise you meant they used mF to *mean* microfarads.

Boncuk said:
Some countries don't have the "µ" in their alphabet. So mF and µF could be mixed up easily.
Thanks for the clarification Boncuk.
 
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Papabravo

Well-Known Member
And before SI prefixes were standardized those old schematics used "mmF" for micro-micro Farads also known as pico Farads in modern parlance.
 

Mark68

New Member
Thank You.....I think visual, not technical. If I can get a picture in my mind...I won't forget it..and I understand it...Technical ( just a bunch of #'s ) don't work well with me.

Thanks Everyone....Appreciated!
 
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