1. Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.
    Dismiss Notice

PIC programer

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers' started by davidbball13, Jul 30, 2008.

  1. Krumlink

    Krumlink New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Messages:
    2,080
    Likes:
    20
    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    Of course david you are saying that "this one is fine" when you have zero experience, and as apposed of listening to experienced members you rather waste money. Getting a PICkit2 or Junebug makes more sense.
     
  2. colin mac

    colin mac New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    Messages:
    367
    Likes:
    4
    Location:
    Ireland
    And ICSP.

    Probably best to go with the PICkit2 clone though since it's compatible with Microchip's software.
     
  3. davidbball13

    davidbball13 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    Messages:
    399
    Likes:
    3
    Location:
    Up State New York
    ok i got it. so this one
    http://cgi.ebay.ie/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...878645&translate=no&ssPageName=LanguageToggle

    is usb, has a zif socket, has an ICSP cable, and is not JDM. and i could go and get a few PICs from jameco. so I think I will get this one. one more question.
    what programs will i use to write the .hex (or linux equivalent) and one to program the pic
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 1997
    Messages:
    -
    Likes:
    0


     
  5. davidbball13

    davidbball13 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    Messages:
    399
    Likes:
    3
    Location:
    Up State New York

    i did not say that i sayed ( i think or i ment) it looks fine i just did not know that it being suckish that it flat out does not work. ok brah'.
     
  6. davidbball13

    davidbball13 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    Messages:
    399
    Likes:
    3
    Location:
    Up State New York
    yeah but will the microchip software be available for linux
     
  7. AllVol

    AllVol New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2005
    Messages:
    956
    Likes:
    9
    Location:
    Tennesee, USA
    Here's another idea if you go with PICkit 2: You can get your chips free from Microchip through their sample program. Since I got my PICkit, I have received 12F509, 12F693, 16F505, 16F688,16F88,16F248A,16F876A and a spare 16F690 through the generosity of Microchip. Also, I have had to buy no crystals or caps, since most come with INTOSC. The 16F876A I am running on EXTRC.

    Zero cost, young man.
     
  8. futz

    futz Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2007
    Messages:
    2,043
    Likes:
    24
    Location:
    Vancouver, B.C.
    I'd stay far, far away from that thing. It's a copy of a DIY K150 programmer, which is almost totally unsupported these days. I own one. It sits in the junk box now. Useless!

    It was great (very very slow though) when it was new in 2001 or 2002, but the company no longer wants to support it, so no more updates. It won't program many PICs, especially the newer models. And it won't do debugging. Period.

    For the same money you can get a modern PICkit 2 or clone. Awesome support, from the company that makes the chips, and debugging! What's not to like?
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2008
  9. futz

    futz Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2007
    Messages:
    2,043
    Likes:
    24
    Location:
    Vancouver, B.C.
    MPLAB won't work for me with Wine. But there is a pretty good alpha-stage program called Piklab that works reasonably well. No debugging for PICkit 2's yet though. :(

    And SourceBoost BoostC works perfect with Wine! :D

    Eventually Piklab will be a nice program. Already it's amazing considering how young the project is. Right now it's useable, but doesn't really hold up in comparison to MPLAB. I'm a Linux guy, but I keep one Windoze box for microcontroller programming because the best tools are all Windows. Sad but true.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2008
  10. davidbball13

    davidbball13 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    Messages:
    399
    Likes:
    3
    Location:
    Up State New York
    alright looks like im getting a pickit2
    this one
    http://cgi.ebay.com/Clone-Microchip...oryZ4661QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    and i will get a few pics
     
  11. davidbball13

    davidbball13 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    Messages:
    399
    Likes:
    3
    Location:
    Up State New York
    sounds great if i need linux pic programing questions........... i will ask you. what distro are you running. i have linux mint on my ibm t41 i had ubuntu but im really feeling linux mint.
     
  12. futz

    futz Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2007
    Messages:
    2,043
    Likes:
    24
    Location:
    Vancouver, B.C.
  13. futz

    futz Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2007
    Messages:
    2,043
    Likes:
    24
    Location:
    Vancouver, B.C.
    I have one Mint box, but I'm almost totally an Ubuntu guy these days (they're the same thing anyway). Once I finish tuning Mint to suit myself it looks/acts exactly like my Ubuntu box anyway, so why bother? Same goes for pretty much every distro I use though. So lately I just don't try the other ones and stick to the one I know - Ubuntu.

    I used to use Fedora a lot, but I've been underwhelmed by the last few releases - not so good. Used Suse and Mandriva a bit - never liked either one. Used Sabayon some - not too bad. Puppy and Damn Small Linux a bit. Some others I can't think of right now...
     
  14. futz

    futz Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2007
    Messages:
    2,043
    Likes:
    24
    Location:
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Hex is hex. Doesn't matter whether you work in windoze, linux or mac. The standard output file for PICs is good old Intel hex.

    In Windows you use the same IDE that you used to write the program, and that you do your debugging with, to program the PIC. MPLAB, the 800 pound gorilla of PIC IDE's.

    In Linux you might use Piklab or one of the command line programs to program the PIC.

    All things considered, you'd be best off to set up a modest Windows box for microcontroller programming. It doesn't need to be anything earth shaking. I used an old freebie dumpster-found P4 Celeron 1.7MHz (Oops! GHz!) for a long time. Worked well enough. Recently I replaced it with a big fast modern box, which is total overkill for what I do with it. But I never wait - for anything! :D:D
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2008
  15. Krumlink

    Krumlink New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Messages:
    2,080
    Likes:
    20
    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    Megahertz? Do you mean Gigahertz?

    Why not just buy a Junebug? Jeez
     
  16. futz

    futz Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2007
    Messages:
    2,043
    Likes:
    24
    Location:
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Oops! Ya, gigahertz. 1700MHz, that is. :p
     
  17. davidbball13

    davidbball13 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    Messages:
    399
    Likes:
    3
    Location:
    Up State New York
    i dont see a pin out or the names of the pins of the ICSP cable on the pickit2. what are some recommended pics for beginners. i would like osme of all sizes
     
  18. futz

    futz Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2007
    Messages:
    2,043
    Likes:
    24
    Location:
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Pin 1 - VPP - To the MCLR pin on the chip. Don't forget to put a 33K or so pullup resistor on MCLR too (not critical - anything from 10K to 33K is ok).
    Pin 2 - 5V - To VDD on your target circuit.
    Pin 3 - Ground - To Ground on your target circuit
    Pin 4 - PGD - To the PGD pin on the PIC
    Pin 5 - PGC - To the PGC pin on the PIC

    Get a 12F683, 16F88, 18F1320, 18F2550, 18F4550 or 4620. That gives you a bit of a range of different chips in different sizes with different peripherals. Other people will suggest some others probably. Whatever. Once you learn one, the rest are very similar. The PIC product line is very standardized. They mostly just have more or fewer onboard peripheral modules.

    Get a 4MHz and a 20MHz crystal and a few 22pF ceramic disc capacitors. Get a dozen or so 0.1uF ceramic caps and the same number of 100uF electrolytics (and maybe a few 10uF). Some 33K (dozen), 10K (dozen), 4.7K (dozen), 1.2K (dozen), 1K (25), 330 (50) and 180 (25) ohm resistors is good to start with. If you buy these in 200-quantity or better you'll get a big price break. Get some 5mm LEDs - red, green, yellow, blue, whatever you want. A couple 10K trimpots with leads suitable for plugging into a breadboard. Some pin header. Some IDC connectors and an old 40-conductor IDE cable or a floppy cable to rip up and make programming cables out of. Some 2-row header pins and some IDC male headers to make breadboard ICSP adapters out of. A solderless breadboard or two (or more) and wires for it (or make your own). A roll of 30ga wire-wrap wire is useful for projects, but get a roll of something more like 26ga or 24ga for breadboard wires (30ga is too thin). A decent soldering iron and some small-guage rosin-core solder and a can of rosin paste flux too. That's a good start. What have I forgotten? Probably a few things...
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2008
  19. Krumlink

    Krumlink New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Messages:
    2,080
    Likes:
    20
    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    Futz your list sounds really good.
    What language will you be using?
     
  20. davidbball13

    davidbball13 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    Messages:
    399
    Likes:
    3
    Location:
    Up State New York
    i have just about everything on the list except for the crystals and some of the caps. but do i need the program cables it it comes with one
     
  21. jimmythefool

    jimmythefool New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2007
    Messages:
    155
    Likes:
    0
    Location:
    UK
    I think all of those listed PIC's have internal oscillators David, so you can get started without the crystals..:) I never use them myself, but its down to personal needs/preferences I guess

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2008

Share This Page