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critter zapper help appreciated

Discussion in 'Electronic Projects Design/Ideas/Reviews' started by Blank_Stare, Jul 28, 2017.

  1. Blank_Stare

    Blank_Stare New Member

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    I need help designing a circuit that will take power from a 6v DC battery, and change it to an extremely high voltage, but extremely low amperage ZAP!, to discourage raccoons from destroying a piece of equipment I own, without doing any permanent damage to the raccoons. I think the proper circuit will use electronics to make an artificial sine wave, so that the shock has the desired effect.

    Think electronic dog collar, as far as the kind of current specs I want for output. Or you could think micro-horse fence. I have seen some devices on the market designed to do similar duty, that state they have an output of 10,000 to 20,000 volts, but they do not state the amps.

    I would buy something ready made, but I need to make it fit inside the compartment that all the rest of the equipment's parts are in, in order to protect it from weather, and the critters.

    Ideally, the completed device will be about the size of a deck of cards. It MUST be powered by a 6 volt rechargeable battery, that is recharged by a solar cell elsewhere on the equipment.

    The ground output lead from the device will attach to a cage I will be putting around the equipment, and the positive lead will be wrapped around plastic parts that are several inches, to a foot from the cage. A critter reaching through the cage will reach for the object they desire (debris on the automatic corn spreader), and brush against the positive lead. They will then receive a surprising shock, as their arm completes the circuit between the cage and the positive lead wire.

    I can not stress enough that this must be non-lethal. As annoying as these little banditos can be, they are not doing anything unexpected... they are just foraging. I even think they are cool creatures - but they are ruining my equipment, and preventing me from my purpose. After they get jolted a few times, they will learn to forage elsewhere, and everyone is happy.

    I have built, and even designed a few simple circuits. Nothing fancy, and I had help each time. Once I had a schematic for the circuit, I was able to order parts online, and assemble them on my kitchen table.

    At the moment, the biggest unknown is how many volts/amps output to design the circuit for. Once that is known, I can start trying to figure out how to size the electronics for the job.

    Anyone care to help out?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. alec_t

    alec_t Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Welcome to ETO!
    Google "electric fence schematic" and you will find plenty of circuits to do what you want.
     
  3. GromTag

    GromTag Active Member

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    Not quite aware of the set up on that other than of course high voltage low current with a size as small as being around in the double digit milli amp range, there is something you should know about raccoons.

    Their paws are insulated to an degree. I have seen a rather large and ponderous on go beneath an electric fence that has the ability to self clean weeds off of itself, I think it's still down at that barn...

    Any how, the large Raccoon was able to lift the wire up from the low placement and stride right under neath the wire when live, tho after several known passing via the gnawing marks on the doors to get at the the Alfalfa.

    On one occasion the same thing was occurring exempt this time the wire when it was lifted with more tension this go round rolled back and the Raccoon fell with and in doing so used its tail to stop the falling backwards resulting in an abrupt jolt, yank, yell screech, scream, and then a running of doing so into the brush, Still lurks around here, the size of an basketball inflated.

    :Edit: the tail when touching the ground completed the circuit.
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. jpanhalt

    jpanhalt Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    I agree with GroomTag on raccoons.

    I have had a home in the country for about 5 years. It is on a hill, next to a river, and surrounded by farms and county park. Raccoons, groundhogs, an occasional skunk, opossums, squirrels, chipmunks, and smaller rodents were a real problem. Until this year, I only used live traps for the large pests, mostly raccoons and groundhogs. Also trapped one skunk and a few opossums. Spring traps and other lethal methods were for the smaller pests.

    Most pests are known to keep returning if they are not effectively moved or killed. It is known as "annoy and ignore." Unless the shock is lethal, it will eventually be ignored. Live traps are pretty effective. Bait is not really needed, but cantaloupe and/or peanut butter may help. Once you trap one, then you have a problem. In my area, relocating is not legal, so one either releases or kills. Release simply trains them not the get caught so easily the next time.

    In late February, I got an adult spaniel (about 40 #). He has done an amazing job at keeping squirrels and chipmunks away (mice and voles are pretty much just in the barn, which he does not have access to all the time). What surprised me most, though, has been the disappearance of groundhogs and raccoons.

    Over the previous years, I captured between 50 (my first 2 years) and low 20's (last year) of the larger pests. This year, I have not captured a single one. Moreover, I have only seen one groundhog, and it was in a patch quite far from my house.

    I do not think a shocker will help. Traps will reduce the numbers, but leave you with the problem of disposal/relocation. You might consider a dog.

    John
     
  6. alec_t

    alec_t Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Just curious. Does the dog kill the pests, or is its presence enough to scare them off?
     
  7. jpanhalt

    jpanhalt Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Just the presence (including marking), barking, and chasing; although, he has cornered a couple of snakes. They are not destructive and are nonvenomous in my area.

    I have worried about him taking on a mature raccoon, as I have seen raccoons as big as he is. That has not happened. I do keep an eye on it, though.

    John
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2017

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