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Witched Lamp

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Menticol

Active Member
Hi!

I know a lamp doesn't qualify as a Consumer Electronic, but still is an interesting electric case. In the building where I live, there is a lighting fixture consisting of 2 incandescent bulbs in parallel.

In Colombia, mains are 120VAC, 60Hz

Curiously, one of the bulbs keeps burning out. Lifespan ranges from 1 week to 24 hours. Overvoltages, heavy duty cycle or defective bulb lots are ruled out, because the other bulb keeps OK. Spares from every brand, diferent lots, incandescent bulbs, fluorescent bulbs, every type fails.

Another fixture presents the same failure, but its in another circuit and has only one bulb.

Can defective wiring, o another anormality cause this condition?

PS: Building wiring is 5 years old
 
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Menticol

Active Member
Thank you Mr. RB! I'll follow your advice. Nothing that the allmighty WD-40 cannot do :D

Does anyone has another case of bewitched household appliances to share?
 
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mneary

New Member
The most common causes of mystery lamp failures are intermittent/high resistance center terminals in the socket and vibration.
 

Hero999

Banned
What's a witched lamp?

Does it have a broomstick?
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
Oh please do not use WD-40 as an electrical cleaner!!! Buy specific use contact cleaner. You can even burnish the socket contacts using #1200 sandpaper or a small, brass wirebrush. WD-40 can cause real electrical problems!
 

Menticol

Active Member
Oh please do not use WD-40 as an electrical cleaner!!! Buy specific use contact cleaner. You can even burnish the socket contacts using #1200 sandpaper or a small, brass wirebrush. WD-40 can cause real electrical problems!
Really? :eek: I always use WD-40 to clean old potenciometers

A broomstick would be too obvious. It's a stealth witch.
Hahahahahaha
 
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trebor3683

New Member
:) I agree! The problem is with the socket and if cleaning proves ineffective there may be a manufacturing problem (I know it's hard to believe) with the metal parts. Just get a new socket which is usually available from any hardware store and replace it. This will certainly be less expensive than all the bulbs you are throwing away. So, let there be Light!!
 

mneary

New Member
A socket that has poor connections and overheats bulb bases has also overheated itself. The spring contact in the center may have lost its hardness and springiness (temper). It must be replaced.
 

HiTech

Well-Known Member
I've personally witnessed two incidences of further failures using WD-40 as electrical contact cleaner. My friend's dad sprayed it in a wall switch to control a ceiling fan. It burst into flames and smoke! The other case involved a motor armature which smoked, arced and burned up. De-Oxit is by far the best solution for contacts and potentiometers. The mil-spec stuff is absolutely superb. It works so well it's amazing how it brings back proper operation of controls and leaves them lasting that way.
 

Menticol

Active Member
I've personally witnessed two incidences of further failures using WD-40 as electrical contact cleaner
Well, Nigel and you are both right. I use WD-40 even as workbench insect killer, but never caused electrical fires to me. Maybe I'm just lucky, or the formula varies.

On mechanical devices WD-40 removes the dirt, but also takes away desirable lubricants.

For submerged cellphones and cleaning delicate devices I use Isopropyl alcohol, letting it dry.

Maybe the product that Hitech recommends is better, but I guess I should import it. Instead WD-40 is easier to get than air :D
 
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Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I've personally witnessed two incidences of further failures using WD-40 as electrical contact cleaner. My friend's dad sprayed it in a wall switch to control a ceiling fan. It burst into flames and smoke! The other case involved a motor armature which smoked, arced and burned up. De-Oxit is by far the best solution for contacts and potentiometers. The mil-spec stuff is absolutely superb. It works so well it's amazing how it brings back proper operation of controls and leaves them lasting that way.
Spray a propane propelled aerosol on to a live light switch - what a shock when it burst in to flames :p

You shouldn't spray ANYTHING on to a live circuit -considering almost all modern aerosols are highly flammable.

ELECTROMASTER: Edited comment to keep peace.
 
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