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Wiring and controls for motor.

Bonhomme

New Member
I'm building a drum sander and need some advice on wiring and controlling a feed motor. I've done basic wiring on tools like this before (plus, motors, switches) but this one is a little different.
I need a high torque, low speed gear motor - such as a wiper motor https://www.ebay.com/itm/1536993156...FPzb12ZRKu&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY

Controlled by a pwm to adjust speed, like this https://www.amazon.com/Controller-Governor-Industrial-Conveyor-Control/dp/B0969RZG4W

And a power source to go from 110/120 VAC such as https://www.amazon.com/Enclosed-LRS-50-12-MEAN-WELL-Switching/dp/B07CTTZRYS/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?crid=2RC5XR96A80HW&keywords=mean+well+lrs-50-12&qid=1667361276&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIwLjY3IiwicXNhIjoiMC43OSIsInFzcCI6IjAuNTQifQ==&sprefix=lrs+50-12,aps,167&sr=8-3

Are these to right parts to achieve my goal? If not what would you suggest? I want it to work as intended and be safe. Since it will be in a dusty environment, can I put that power supply in a seal box to protect it? Lastly can I run this off from the same cord as the main motor (1 3/4hp, 115v, 15.5a) through a 20a dedicated outlet?

Thanks for any help.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It should work as long as the mechanical load is not too high and you always start with the motor speed at or near zero.

The motor is rated 5A continuous at 5nm torque, with max torque figure or 25m - so presumably a stall (= full speed start peak) current of 25A or higher.

I'd be tempted to go for a rather higher current rated PSU, so it has a better chance of handing starting surges and the running current is a lower percentage of its full rating.

That may also do better in a smallish enclosure.

You can run the PSU from the same power inlet, I'd just add a fuse near the PSU in case it ever has a problem.
 

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