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Wiring an old appliance motor

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tomtom19

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Hi folks,

I want to repurpose a motor pulled from a 1980's trash compactor. Despite having part numbers, I'm having no luck finding any documentation about it. The motor is labeled with model # S67NXJKM-7326 and part # 800130. It came from a Kitchenaid KCS200 which might have been really made by Hobart. Other compactor models that appear to use the same motor assembly include KUCS180S1 and KUCS181T1. After much time searching, I'm unable to find a wiring diagram. I hope somebody here can help me figure it out.

It's a single speed AC motor with reverse. There's a thermal fuse and a centrifugal switch. There are 5 wires - white, black , red, blue and brown. There's continuity between black and red with about 3.7 ohms. The red wire goes through the centrifugal switch, which tells me this is related to a start coil circuit. But wouldn't there be two start coils managed by the switch? The black and red seem isolated from the other three wires so this has me puzzled. The white wire enters the motor through the thermal fuse, where then seems to be shorted to the brown wire - I'm getting 0.1 ohms between white and brown. From there, I'm getting 1.7 ohms to the blue wire.

I'm confused. I'm not finding the 3 coils (two start, one run) like I've seen in other appliance motors. Can someone shed some light on this for me? I'll appreciate any clues.

Tom


IMG_20181128_150904624.jpgIMG_20181128_151008770.jpg
 

shortbus=

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I'm confused. I'm not finding the 3 coils (two start, one run) like I've seen in other appliance motors. Can someone shed some light on this for me? I'll appreciate any clues.
I'm confused too, never saw any motor that had two start winding's in them. The reversal is done by the switch or controller that was connected to the motor, reversing the wiring configuration.

Most every appliance has a wiring diagram some where in the cabinent usually on the first cover that is removed to work on the item. Instead of searching for the motor number, do one for the model of the compactor.
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
Normally there is either a start winding & cap, or the same thing with also a run cap, reversing is done by reversing either start or the run winding, the run winding being the lowest resistance.
Max.
 

tomtom19

New Member
Here's an example of a motor with two start windings, also from a trash compactor but not the model I'm searching for information on.
1543603605285.png

Believe me, I've searched high and low for an appliance wiring diagram. I've gotten close. The diagram referenced here would likely solve my inquiry: AP3127541

I found a site, Appliantology.com, that apparently has a copy of it, but it's accessible only to repair professionals, which I am not: KitchenAid Compactor KUCS180S Technical Info Bundle.

Thanks
 

tomtom19

New Member
Thanks Max. I don't think this uses any start or run capacitor, as there is no capacitor mentioned in the parts list.
 

alec_t

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I'm not finding the 3 coils (two start, one run)
From the pic it looks like the three wire bundles nearest the centre of the motor are of thinner wire than the six other bundles. Perhaps the thinner wires define one coil with no externally accessible connections and the thicker wires define two other coils with the four external connections shown?
 

pfofit

Active Member
like this tom. edited for a clearer diagram
Scan4.JPG

Washing machine motors with three windings are two speed like this
They always start in high speed and the centrifugal sw drops it into low.
IMG_2141e.JPG
replace above pic to correct wiring error
 
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tomtom19

New Member
Thanks so much, pfofit. The wiring diagram you drew for me works. I really appreciate you sharing your knowledge and taking the time to diagram it. It's exactly what I needed.

Tom
 

shortbus=

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
like this tom. edited for a clearer diagram
View attachment 115435
The first one shows only a single start winding, and works like I said in post #2. But the TS says that isn't how his motor works, that it has two start windings, so how does the hand wrawn schematic solve his problem? Not trying to be combative but to understand a new concept. I do understand the two speed, but not how the hand drawn one fits the problem.
 

ClydeCrashKop

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It looks to me like in the hand drawn schematic, it swaps polarity on the start windings. One way the start windings are in phase with the run windings. The other way in reverse, the start windings are 180 degrees out of phase with the run windings.
 
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tomtom19

New Member
... the TS says that isn't how his motor works, that it has two start windings...
I thought that this motor would have two start windings, because I knew of another motor, also single speed and reversible (and also from a trash compactor) that has two. It was a naive assumption on my part that this one would be similar. Thanks to everyone here, we got it figured out. Like you said, you learn something new every day.
 

shortbus=

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It looks to me like in the hand drawn schematic, it swaps polarity on the start windings. One way the start windings are in phase with the run windings. The other way in reverse, the start windings are 180 degrees out of phase with the run windings.
Yeah was aware of that, but it wasn't the same as explained in the original text. But the thread starter cleared it up. It ended up being like I posted in post #2.
 

pfofit

Active Member
FYI:
I re-posted the second photo image i posted above in post 8 with a correction as i just noticed it had a wiring error.
Rare find.
 
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