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Windscreen wiper motor questions

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bitem2k

New Member
If i open the gearbox thingy is it difficult to put it back together? (i.e will lots of things fall out?)

thanks
 

HarveyH42

Banned
The one I opened didn't have much to fall out. There aren't any springs to come flying out or anything like that. Unless you drop it, everything should stay in place. It was a greasy mess, so I just closed it back up.
 

bitem2k

New Member
Ive just tried to open the motor.
I can only open the motor part up, not the gearbox part. The gearbox part doesnt have any screws, only rivet type things.

When i opened the motor though, around the copper core are some blue-ish metal things (magnets?), a few of the metal things are worn moderately in places, revealing a bright metal surface.


1) Is the damage I described to the motor metalic objects serious? And has it been caused by the heat, or lack of grease?
2)If i cant open the gearbox, i wont be able to apply grease (if needed).

thanks very much.
 

bitem2k

New Member
HarveyH42 said:
Since it got hot enough to mention, guessing very hot. I'd open the gear head and see if there is damage, and just to make sure its well greased after the melt. Makes a big difference...
I tried to open the gearhead but I cant because I think its got some rivet type things.

I opened the motor part, and surrounding the copper wire core, there are lots of blue coloured things (magnets?).
On a few of the magnets there is some damage(worn areas), revealing a shiny silvery metal coloured surface.

1)Could this damage have been caused by the heat, and/or lack of grease?
2)Is it standard practise to secure the gearhead in this way?

thanks
 

HarveyH42

Banned
Really no automotive expert (fix what I have to). Only open it the one, think it came out of an early 80's Ford P.O.S.(as describes most Ford cars), been a while. A lot of stuff is made to be replaced as a unit, instead of just the failed component. Likely more trouble then it's worth. If you were really set on using wiper motors for something, might be worth drill out the rivets just to see what's inside. I would think they are easy and cheap to find at the salvage yard. Kind of depends on if you have the spare time, the curiousity, and the tools.
 

bitem2k

New Member
HarveyH42 said:
Really no automotive expert (fix what I have to). Only open it the one, think it came out of an early 80's Ford P.O.S.(as describes most Ford cars), been a while. A lot of stuff is made to be replaced as a unit, instead of just the failed component. Likely more trouble then it's worth. If you were really set on using wiper motors for something, might be worth drill out the rivets just to see what's inside. I would think they are easy and cheap to find at the salvage yard. Kind of depends on if you have the spare time, the curiousity, and the tools.

If i were to drill out the rivets, how would i seal it back again?

thanks
 

bristol188

New Member
What's hot?

Nigel Goodwin said:
I can't say I've ever had any occasion to feel a wiper motor! :D

But electric drill and vacuum cleaner motors get too hot to touch.
A temperature well over boiling point of water is not too hot for most motors but will cause a blister if touched for to long.
 

bitem2k

New Member
right,
I drilled the rivets and all appears to be well inside the gearhead. Lots of grease.
I ran the motor without the gearhead on, and it still gets really hot.

If i connect negative lead from the 12v battery to the case of the motor,
I can then touch either wire, yellow or white with the postive lead from the 12v battery and it will work.

I dont quite understand this. I thought that one was + and one was -, but if the case is negative, surely only one of these wires should make the motor work?
Any ideas?

thanks
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
bitem2k said:
right,
I drilled the rivets and all appears to be well inside the gearhead. Lots of grease.
I ran the motor without the gearhead on, and it still gets really hot.

If i connect negative lead from the 12v battery to the case of the motor,
I can then touch either wire, yellow or white with the postive lead from the 12v battery and it will work.

I dont quite understand this. I thought that one was + and one was -, but if the case is negative, surely only one of these wires should make the motor work?
Any ideas?
The case is negative, the two wires are usually for two different speeds.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
bitem2k said:
So why does the motor turn if I connect both wires and not the case?
Because you're still connecting to the motor windings, effectively putting them in series, with the ground connection being the common.

It's not an 'opinion', it's not a 'guess' - the casing IS THE NEGATIVE MOTOR CONNECTION - this is how car electrics work!.
 

bitem2k

New Member
Ok thanks,
Do you think that my heating problem could be caused by me connecting + and - to both wires, instead of - to the case and + to one of the wires?
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
bitem2k said:
Ok thanks,
Do you think that my heating problem could be caused by me connecting + and - to both wires, instead of - to the case and + to one of the wires?
Quite probably, it's certainly a VERY bad way to connect it - it had never occured to me you might be connecting it in that way?.
 

bitem2k

New Member
Nigel Goodwin said:
Quite probably, it's certainly a VERY bad way to connect it - it had never occured to me you might be connecting it in that way?.
whoops!

Ok thanks very much mate.
 
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