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Where's the best place to look for salvaged component specs

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kinarfi

Well-Known Member
I toasted a SMD SS34 diode on aboard I have and went looking through my junk boards and came up with what I thought would work until sprouted legs and ran away, damn those thing are hard to find :banghead: I found another that appears to be doing the job, but I don't know what it's properties are, just that it appears to be physically large enough and appears the schottkey.
Is there a better place to look for specs than just typing "smd pb 13 diode" on google,worked for ss34 (40 v 3a) but not for pb13.
Will look more and finish reading copper tonite.
Thanks
Jeff
 

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vtech

Active Member
When it comes to SMD coding, since there has never been any standards. You can spend hours only to find something completely different.
There are many code books on line. Each manufacturer beats a different drum. Part of my job has been component replacement research for several years and when it comes to semiconductor SMD markings, it is usually a waste of time.
You are much better off try getting a diagram,reverse engineer, or even SWAG based on the surrounding components.
I have ran across the exact same device from the same manufacturer yet with different markings!
In my experience if/when you get familiar with a specific device manufacturer, they do tend to stay consistent as much as possible

If you get lucky, there may be a logo on the device (sometimes very tiny or even on the reverse side).
Sometimes you can try an image search with a clean picture.
Typing the device package type (SOTxxx) or even "body marking" with the code number may reveal something.

Couple links;
www.turuta.md/demobook/SMD-2014-sample.pdf
www.dl7avf.info/charts/smdcode
 

GromTag

Active Member
As with, SMD markings can and often do lead to incorrect part. PB as in PB 13 , may be a Varicap Diode, VHF Variable capacitance Diode, Close to NXP BB152. However the Connections on the BB152 differ on Datasheet from the PB13 image.

:Edited:

The BB152 may be That part, tho it is an obsolete component, replacement list if any attempt toward the PB 13 - possible BB152 as an replacement would be BB202, an updated number part.

Also again this is a drawing straws type of thing with SMD parts letter/numbering.

Used: The SMD CodeBook Marsport R P Blackwell, GM4PMK as a ref to that PB part. Again I refer to the term of drawing straws on the part itself.
 
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large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Is it just me? Or does the datasheet data base seem to be getting smaller? I had a datasheet ages ago, I tried to look for it again and came up blank!!

Good luck Jeff, finding replacement parts can be a nightmare
 

kinarfi

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the come backs, some valuable information here!
Should have said this in the original post, the ss34 is the rectifier from a step up module, I let the output leads short together, OOOPs.
I'm still looking for 2 things, the PB13 specs, it came off of a server power supply board, right next to an inductor, so I figure it's part of a smps setup, but I haven't found the specs, it's forward voltage drop indicates schottkey.
The other thing I'm still looking for is the other replacement I found that grew wings and flew away, it had a forward voltage drop of .089v if I remember and read my meter correctly, even if that does seem low.
The PB13 is in the circuit and feeding a COB LED, voltage = 35, current = 600ma, seems like it's working.
Thanks, again,
Jeff
 

throbscottle

Well-Known Member
Stuff from my bookmarks:
I've used this before: http://www.s-manuals.com/smd
There was a really good Russian site too, but it's gone away. You might have some luck if you can be bothered looking for UA1ZH. I found this when searching for that name, but I don't think as extensive as the database as the original site was. You can download the zip and find the marking in the relevant .doc. I had to view the site in original Russian to be able to downlod the file. https://translate.google.com/transl....php?act=categories&CODE=article&article=1363
This may also be useful: http://www.talkingelectronics.com/projects/SurfaceMount/SurfaceMount-P1.html
I think you are chasing a red herring with your mark-code. I think it's either PB or 13. Since 13 gets you a transistor, it's probably PB, which gets you this: MA2Q736 (which I found in a full 2007 version of the Turuta book I got from somewhere). The 13 is more likely to be a date mark or batch number or something like that.
 

throbscottle

Well-Known Member
It's also worth looking for "SMD mark codes" "SMD top mark" and "SMD codebook" in your favourite search engine.
 

GromTag

Active Member
As for the datasheet base list getting smaller? possible removal of outdated chips and those that might not have ever existed regardless of how few those types would be.
 

large_ghostman

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
As for the datasheet base list getting smaller? possible removal of outdated chips and those that might not have ever existed regardless of how few those types would be.
Bad news for those of us with obsolete parts box's :D.
 

throbscottle

Well-Known Member
That's why it's a good idea to trawl several of the d/s sites. The most obscure stuff tends to have the sheet in Japanese, with notes like "draft" and "incomplete" on it. You can still get some sense from them though. If desperate you can find someone who can translate... But unless it's an in-house part number it's usually possible to find a d/s on the interwebs...
alltransistors.com is pretty good too.
 
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